methyl bromide


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methyl bromide

[′meth·əl ′brō‚mīd]
(organic chemistry)
CH3Br A toxic, colorless gas that forms a crystalline hydrate with cold water; used in synthesis of organic compounds, and as a fumigant.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chronic exposure to methyl bromide is difficult to assess because there are no exposure biomarkers (Minnesota Department of Health 1999).
We observed a higher accumulation of phosphorus in the grasses grown in the substrate treated with methyl bromide (Table 2), whereas B.
Sporicide properties of methyl bromide and its use for disinfection [Abstract].
The condemnation of methyl bromide is an example of regulators focusing on something because it is convenient, even if the effort makes little sense, affords little benefit, and exact huge costs.
Juge Gregg of the Environmental Investigation Agency says, "The California Strawberry Commission has known for 13 years that the industry needs to stop using methyl bromide, yet the Commission has relied on Washington lobbying to keep the methyl bromide flowing.
The importance of the invention has been underlined by the existing ban in principle on methyl bromide under the international Montreal Protocol on restricting gases that damage ozone.
Although methyl bromide was not proscribed in the original text of the Montreal Protocol with chlorofluorocarbons and halons, policy-makers recognized a decade later that it was a powerful ozone-depleting chemical that had destroyed as much as 4% of the planet's ozone layer over the previous two decades.
Unlike other ozone-destroying chemicals, methyl bromide has natural sources, including fungi that surround microscopic plant roots (SN: 12/22&29/01, p.
With the phasing-out of methyl bromide, the most common and effective soil fumigant, and the increasing tolerance of soil-borne pests to other synthetic soil fumigants, mustard plants may find a place in the vegetable crop rotation.
Methyl bromide was condensed onto the MgO substrate at temperatures between 175 K and 179 K.
As anthrax and other biological weapons continue to be threats, a University of Florida, Gainesville, researcher has found that a common pest control agent called methyl bromide is more-effective and cheaper than current treatments in eradicating deadly bacterial spores from buildings.
The UN-backed initiative to phase out the toxic agrochemical known as methyl bromide is hailed by officials as the largest environmental project to be undertaken here in the past decade.