metric

(redirected from metrically)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Financial.

metric

1. of or relating to the metre or metric system
2. Maths denoting or relating to a set containing pairs of points for each of which a non-negative real number ρ(x, y) (the distance) can be defined, satisfying specific conditions
3. Maths the function ρ(x, y) satisfying the conditions of membership of such a set (a metric space)

Metric

 

a mathematical term that denotes the rule for determining a given distance between any two points (elements) of a given set A. A real number function that satisfies the following three conditions is called the distance ρ (a, b) between the points a and b of the set A: (1) ρ (a, b) ≧ 0, where ρ(a, b) = 0 if and only if a = b; (2) ρ(a, b) = ρ(b, a); and (3) ρ(a, b) + ρ(b, c) ≧ ρ(a, c). For a given set M, a metric may be introduced in other ways. For example, on a plane we may take not only the ordinary Euclidean distance

as the distance between points a and b having coordinates (x1, y1) and (x2, y2), respectively, but we may take other distances as well, for example,

ρ1(a, b) = ǀx1x2ǀ + ǀy1y2ǀ

In (functional and coordinate) vector spaces a metric is often defined as a norm or, sometimes, as a scalar product. In differential geometry, a metric is introduced by specifying an element of arc length by means of a differential quadratic form. A set that has a metric introduced in it is referred to as a metric space.

A metric is sometimes understood to denote a rule for determining not only distances but also angles; an example is a projective metric.

V. I. SOBOLEV

metric

[′me·trik]
(mathematics)
A real valued “distance” function on a topological space X satisfying four rules: for x, y, and z in X, the distance from x to itself is zero; the distance from x to y is positive if x and y are different; the distance from x to y is the same as the distance from y to x ; and the distance from x to y is less than or equal to the distance from x to z plus the distance from z to y (triangle inequality).

metric

metric

Measurement. Although metric generally refers to a system of weights and measures, software engineers often use the term as simply "measurement." For example, "is there a metric for this process?" See software metrics.
References in periodicals archive ?
Rig Veda: A Metrically Restored Text with an Introduction and Notes.
Vocable insertion in David Minyimak's 314 songs (JU22-32): An interesting case of metrically motivated vocable insertion is found in a set of songs composed by David Minyimak.
He describes the prosodic variations employed by the tragedians in order to accommodate metrically intractable words and phrases.
Facts, that is, empirical (physical) facts, are metrically amorphous, for Poincare.
At this point, Prince frequently wrote in script above typewritten lines, as if he were scanning, metrically, the weight of each word--or its weightlessness, the various resonances of its transcription and its "look," typed or handwritten.
The reader gets a sense of a hands-on, metrically oriented leader with his eye on outcomes--precisely what our client was seeking.
Because of the significance of the rhyme and rhythm for the poem's effect, I shall not even attempt to translate these two verses metrically, but their gist, in prose, is: "My sweetvoiced girl, don't run away, come, stay, and let me put a gentle hand upon your breast.
Casanatense 897), and it would have been useful to identify the metrically virtuosic late sonnet Quel che la Terra feo di nulla e 'l Cielo as a sonetto continuo (see Ossola and Segre, eds.
numerous different figures metrically eligible to be paired with a
Classical Prosody denoting a distich the first line of which is a dactylic hexameter and the second a pentameter, or a verse differing from the hexameter by suppression of the arsis or metrically unaccented part of the third and the sixth foot.
To 21 reappears as CSM 87, which was long ago identified as metrically highly problematic.
At seventy-five, Montague continues to write accessible, visually rich, metrically pulsed poems in the music of Hiberno-English.