metropolitan

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metropolitan

1. constituting a city and its suburbs
2. of, relating to, or designating an ecclesiastical metropolis
3. of or belonging to the home territories of a country, as opposed to overseas territories
4. 
a. Eastern Churches the head of an ecclesiastical province, ranking between archbishop and patriarch
b. Church of England an archbishop
c. RC Church an archbishop or bishop having authority in certain matters over the dioceses in his province
References in periodicals archive ?
Yet what might appear as a symbolic narrative in which the avenging ghost of the old country house returns to haunt the city which destroyed it, is ultimately circumscribed, I will argue, at a further level of discourse: that of Elia's own self-reflexive metropolitanism as a figure of the London Magazine.
As Treadwell observes, Elia's metropolitanism is manifested over the essay series not simply in terms of how London is represented.
As Robert Rotenburg has argued, metropolitanism creates an imaginary city of heightened possibilities that must nevertheless interact with the space of lived experience.
5) Maurice Careless, << Frentierism, Metropolitanism and Canadian History >>, Canadian Historical Review 35 (1953), 63-83; Donald F.
6); metropolitanism, cosmopolitansim and nationalism; and modernism and traditionalism.
Richard Dennis, "Interpreting the Apartment House: Modernity and Metropolitanism in Toronto, 1900-1930," Journal of Historical Geography 20 (1994), 305-22.
Richard Dennis, "Interpreting the apartment house: modernity and metropolitanism in Toronto, 1900-1930", Journal of Historical Geography 20 (1994), 305-322; Marc H.
When general themes are discussed, such as metropolitanism, dependency, or the globalization of capital as well as more specific themes such as government relations, health and safety, or the impact of technological change, they provide this framework.
It must be understood that for Linteau metropolitanism is a framework rather than a theme.
This article suggests that while the economic, political and social context provided by the development of capitalism is the framework for the study of the absorption of semi-autarchic economies and local cultures into increasingly broader regional, national and international systems during the nineteenth century, the concepts of modernization and metropolitanism are spatially over-generalized.
1) A couple of years later I asked the rhetorical question whether many of us who had previously regarded ourselves as scholars of South African English Literature had not now become, or wanted to become--in the wake of the poststructuralist turn and the death of the author as a revered figure--academic 'rock stars' in our own right, more interested in writing in our names on any number of sexy topics (cities, oceanic discourse, jazz, metropolitanisms, whiteness studies, ugly/beautiful aesthetics, self-styling, to name a few) than in the more modest tasks of assessing, describing and evaluating the writings of others demarcated as 'imaginative SA writers'.