Miasmas

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Miasmas

 

according to old ideas (in the “prebacterial” period), noxious emanations, the products of decay, which supposedly cause infectious diseases. Since the 19th century the term “miasmas” has been used only in a figurative sense.

References in periodicals archive ?
The British rapper, tastemaker and provocateur is peddling pop miasma on her third album, AoMayaAoAua
Bigelsen reminds us that inflammation, Miasma, is the underlying disease process.
The miasma of volcanic ash hovering over Europe showed no sign of dissipating Saturday, keeping thousands of forlorn travelers stranded across the continent for a third day and worsening economic losses.
Hesse camber coolant lakeside bloodline spew diorama opec miasma teheran lunch.
Renewable Fuels Association President and CEO Bob Dinneen says one of the greatest threats to the global ethanol industry is the "the miasma of misinformation" circulated by opponents of the fuel, attacks that he termed "shameless, senseless, implausible, and illogical.
In a sea of primitive scrawlings Jay Burton elevates himself above me cave-painting miasma.
The legal process eventually will clear the air on the David McGrath case, but the miasma of political manipulation is apt to linger.
Chapters follow in the redefinition of smoke as pollution in the last decades of the nineteenth century, as anxieties about miasma subsided; the relationship between smoky skies, urban degeneration and eugenics; and London's Great Smog disaster of 1952, as a result of which over 4,000 lives were lost and a shocked British public finally supported policies to clear the air.
And yet and yet, every year Wimbledon somehow works its magic, a miasma of sensuality descends over the whole event, clean-limbed youngsters caper vigorously in the evening sun of Eden and I begrudge them nothing.
Once persuaded that the miasma theory was wrong, he took it upon himself to canvass his neighborhood.
Where is our desire to be the body of Christ in the world, instead of a fractious miasma of bickering malcontents?
Individual essays include "Mocking Success in 'Every Which Way but Loose'", "Irony as Absolution", "Mystic Moral Miasma in 'Mystic River'", and much more.