microcassette


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microcassette

A smaller version of the analog audio cassette. Introduced in 1969 by Olympus, microcassettes were widely used for recording dictation and messages in a pocket-sized device. Because the recording speed is slower and the tape is thinner than an audio cassette, a tiny microcassette can hold 30 minutes per side. A dictation feature of many devices was variable playback speed.

Microcassettes were also used to record messages in some telephone answering machines; however, in the 1990s, tape-based recorders of all kinds evolved into solid state devices. See voice recorder, audio cassette and cassette.


Microcassette and Recorder
The red and white microcassette is resting on an audio cassette for size comparison. Both use 1/8" wide tape, but the tape is thinner in the microcassette. Microcassette recorders are small enough to slip into a shirt pocket.
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They were already angry that I had accused them of stealing my microcassette recorder, had them empty their pockets, and had an administrator frisk Mecca.
Cost: A basic audio system with professional or high-end consumer equipment would cost between $8,000 and $11,000 and would allow playback, duplication, and repair of audiocassettes and microcassettes.
Unlike microcassette recorders, DVRs are lighter and leaner--and offer hours of digital data storage rime without the need to purchase and store numerous cassettes.
A Price Club manager once apprehended Walton walking around a store making notes to himself with a microcassette tape recorder.
These include film and filmless cameras, Microcassette and digital voice recorders, binoculars, film scanners, personal photo printers, medical and industrial endoscopes, biological and metallurgical microscopes and measuring instruments, clinical analyzers, and other high technology products.
Alternately, students might be allowed to maintain a written or verbal reaction or comment bin, using notepads or microcassette recorders, to immediately record their thoughts for later discussion.
My household includes two school-boys, two functional (and one semi-functional) computers, two color and two black-and-white televisions, three boomboxes, two stereo systems, two videocassette recorders and two handheld microcassette recorders.
And not even directly by telephone, but, to be more precise, through its trusty, nearby, and normally under-utilized squire (hereafter UUS, pronounced--if you will forgive the allusion to bridge-and-tunnel-New-York English that surrounds me so--"yous", as in "yous guys"), the answering machine: a message (now hauntingly termed, in some quarters, "voice mail") left on tape, and, for that matter, on an ancient and otherwise unplayable Panasonic microcassette, heretofore humble domain of announcements of new copyediting assignments or chiropractor tomorrow at three's.
Observations were either made directly (writing notes or speaking into a microcassette recorder) or by video camera.
Coaches' comments to players during 30 time-outs at a high school girls' volleyball tournament and during 20 time-outs at a high school boys' basketball tournament were recorded by microcassette and later transcribed and content analyzed.
Forty-nine of the interviews were taped using a microcassette recorder; one client preferred to have notes taken by hand.
Other useful equipment includes a microcassette recorder, which allows security personnel to take verbal notes (to be written down after the operation is over) while they observe a scene; a 35 mm camera with an 80 mm zoom lens for taking pictures of suspicious activity; binoculars; and communications equipment such as cell phones, radios, and alphanumeric pagers in the event that the countersurveillance team notices an attack in progress and needs to call police and other security personnel for immediate backup.