microcytosis


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

microcytosis

[‚mī·krə·sī′tō·səs]
(medicine)
A blood disorder characterized by a preponderance of microcytes.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the setting of globin chain deficiency and imbalance, red cell hemoglobin content is decreased, resulting in microcytosis and hypochromia.
However, in patients with persistent unexplained microcytosis and/ or hyopchromia following a thorough haematological assessment, a full investigation for the presence of a haemoglobinopathy is warranted.
Laboratory findings in iron deficiency Complete blood count: RDW>14 RBC: low Hb, Hct: low according to age and gender MCV: low according to age and gender When specifying the lower limit of MCV: 70+age (for >10 years) (if MCV is <72, generally abnormal) Upper limit of MCV: 84 + age x 0,6 (for >6 months) (if MCV>98: always abnormal) MCH<27 pg MCHC<30% Thrombocytosis Rarely: Thrombocytopenia, leukopenia Peripheral smear: Hypochromia Microcytosis Anisochromia Anisocytosis Pencil cells Rarely: bazophilic stippling, target cells, hypersegmented neutrophils Serum ferritin<12 ng/mL (a) Serum iron: <30 mcg/dL (a) TIBC>480 mcg/dL Transferrin saturation (Iron/TBCx100)<16% Metzner index (MCV/RBC)<13 (a) May change by age, gender and other factors.
In recent years there has been increasing recognition of the importance of a low MCH without microcytosis as an early indicator of iron deficiency (even in the absence of anaemia) (16,17) While IDA may be both microcytic and hypochromic, hypochromia often precedes the onset of microcytosis.
Additional laboratory evaluation revealed a normal hemoglobin level and 2+ erythrocyte microcytosis on an automated blood smear.
An MCV less than this range suggests microcytosis, while greater levels suggest macrocytosis.
High prevalence of alpha-thalassemia among individuals with microcytosis and hypochromia without anemia.
Peripheral smear revealed significant anisocytosis, microcytosis, hypochromia and poikilocytosis.
The red cells of S/C disease are severely dehydrated, causing mild microcytosis and crystal formation (2).
In the above conditions, anaemia is typically normocytic and normochromic, with a notable absence of reticulocytes, although microcytosis and hypochromia may be present due to the very high frequency of alpha and beta thalassemia traits and/or iron deficiency in many endemic areas (28).
Peripheral blood smears show microcytosis, hypochromia, anisopoikilocytosis, target cells and basophilic stippling.
Homozygous HbE patients (EE) experience a mild, asymptomatic anemia characterized by microcytosis and target cells whereas the heterozygotes (AE) are clinically normal but express a few microcytes and HbE on electrophoresis.