microeconomics

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microeconomics

the branch of economics concerned with particular commodities, firms, or individuals and the economic relationships between them
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References in periodicals archive ?
To be sure, economics is not a value-neutral subject, and few microeconomists have ever shown any interest in developing the technical details of a "countermicroeconomics" grounded in Calvinist and Puritan assumptions.
A microeconomist would, more precisely, say that demand is price inelastic when the supplier has high bargaining power.
Reder's was certainly a very poor review, but the total incomprehension revealed by a prominent Chicago microeconomist was surely worth the space, for that reason alone.
Perhaps microeconomists reading this book will have a different reaction, but as a macroeconomist, the critique of "expertise" may deserve yet another book.
microeconomists, and brought his intelligence and experience to the White House," says Jennifer Hunt, who worked closely with Matsudaira while she was chief economist at the Department of Labor and deputy assistant secretary for microeconomic analysis at the Department of the Treasury.
creative and deep microeconomists of the 20th century") .
Economic Deregulation: Days of Reckoning for Microeconomists.
The lack of horizontality has gone even deeper, leading in many cases to incompatibility between advice given by macro- and microeconomists.
In response, Harvard professors, including mathematicians and microeconomists, have dissected the university's data and question whether its health costs have been growing as fast as the university says.
Microeconomists have various objections to the intuitive solution.
Of course, the degree to which one believes markets fail is one factor that divides liberal and conservative microeconomists.
The pricing of telecommunication services differs from many of the standard goods and services studied by microeconomists in that the originator of a potential transaction does so with no guarantee that the other party is either present or interested.