microfilament


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microfilament

[¦mī·krō′fil·ə·mənt]
(cell and molecular biology)
One of the cytoplasmic fibrous structures, about 5 nanometers in diameter, virtually identical to actin; thought to be important in the processes of phagocytosis and pinocytosis.
References in periodicals archive ?
With a weight of 100gsm and the exceptional density of the microfilaments, towels made from Evolon are ultra-light and take up five times less space than terrycloth towels.
The 3D structure reinforces the uniformity of the microfilaments and increases ease of handling, making it possible to supply 3D microfilament wipes which are one-and-a-half to two times lighter than the lightweight wipes traditionally obtained using competing processes," he says.
The resulting composites were extruded through a twin-screw microcompounder (DSM Xplore) at 230[degrees]C and 100 rpm to produce microfilaments of about 100 pm diameter.
As cells at the boundary between thyroid and pharynx convert from pharyngeal to thyroid tissue, they elongate to become spindle shaped, their apical microfilament bands thicken, and they become raised above the level of the adjacent pharyngeal cells to form a ridge (Shain and others 1972; Hilfer 1973).
To do this," says Dobrinsky, "we placed from 10 to 20 embryos into small straws in a solution containing a compound called a microfilament inhibitor.
Another important growth market for Freudenberg is Evolon, its microfilament nonwoven material, which was developed more than a decade ago but continues to evolve.
5 after DBP exposure (Figure 4), we presume that the DBP-induced microfilament changes resulted from protein redistribution, although DBP-induced protein degradation and/or translational regulation cannot be excluded.
The ATM compounds target the microfilament component of the cancer cell and when used in conjunction with standard anti-microtubular drugs, result in comprehensive and fatal destruction of the cancer cell's cytoskeleton.
CM exerts significant effects on the actin cytoskeleton in human prostate cancer cells, including altering microfilament organization and function, representing an important mechanism by which CM functions as a chemopreventative agent, and as an inhibitor of angiogenesis and metastasis (Holy 2004).
I carry a medium-heavy, fast-action spinning rod loaded with 30-pound microfilament, rigged with 3 feet of 50-or 60-pound leader and a jighead tipped with a plastic eel.
The 10-g microfilament test identified 16% of patients who screened positive for diabetic peripheral neuropathy, yet about twice as many (31%) met the clinical definition of diabetic peripheral neuropathy.