microlayer

microlayer

[′mī·krō‚lā·ər]
(oceanography)
The thin zone beneath the surface of the ocean or any free water surface within which physical processes are modified by proximity to the air-water boundary.
References in periodicals archive ?
The sea-surface microlayer (SML), the aqueous boundary layer between the ocean and atmosphere, plays an important role in the exchange of gases between the ocean and atmosphere.
1974), concentration of organic substances in the subsurface microlayer (Frew and Nelson, 1992), and on the wind speed (Huhnerfuss et al.
25:1, which is associated with the formation of disturbed microlayer on the surface of mineral additives while grinding, containing a very limited amount of amorphous Si[O.
Microlayer co-extrusion technology shows promise in applications ranging from films to membranes, optics, and electronic system but is currently limited to the layering of materials with very similar viscosities.
2:30 Flex Barrier Property Enhancement in Film Structures Using Microlayer Coextrusion Technology 1560893 | Patrick C.
The conditions of formation of the chemical composition of the sea surface microlayer and techniques for studying organic matter in it, Geochem.
the microlayer, if it is to move beyond simply observing major shifts in environment and activities.
Then a second feedblock would receive this 20 microlayer structure and the melt stream of PP outer material, diverting the PP into two skin layers over the microlayer core.
As you can see, large particles were captured on the relatively open upstream, fine particles were captured in the middle microlayer.
The single-domain iron particles of the elongated form where produced in microlayer condensates (MLC) with the copper matrix (including in the MLC with decomposing layers), deposited from the vapour phase on the surface of the steel substrate using the technology of electron beam vacuum evaporation and condensation.
The first one is adhesive microlayer evaporation beneath the base of growing bubble which takes place during the growth time [1].