micrometeoroid


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micrometeoroid

[¦mī·krō′mē·dē·ə‚rȯid]
(astronomy)
A very small meteoroid with diameter generally less than a millimeter.
References in periodicals archive ?
And traveling along its path are micrometeoroids (particles including rocks and human space trash like paint chips, nuts, and bolts).
The 14-day mission to the International Space Station will deliver the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer and spare parts that include two S-band communications antennas, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for the Dextre robot and micrometeoroid debris shields.
As result, when the tile surface gets hit, whether by a micrometeoroid or shuttle debris, it cracks or chips.
Rollins proposed, designed and conducted a series of complex tests with thermal protection system materials and flight-like sensors to detect micrometeoroid and orbital debris damage for the Orion spacecraft.
The scientists believe that the crater -- roughly 100 micrometers in diameter -- formed when a chondritic micrometeoroid struck the craft at high velocity, leaving a dent in an aluminum panel near its leading edge.
As their final spacewalk task, the crew photographed the exterior of Zvezda, including Russian sensors that measure micrometeoroid impacts, handrails, propulsion systems and a ham radio antenna.
It is designed to collect data on micrometeoroid impacts and the effect of the microgravity environment on a number of materials housed on witness plates.
ISAS engineers considered several instruments as candidates for the mission, but Nishimura says they chose the micrometeoroid detector because it is the simplest in design and the lightest in weight.
Each of the sample materials is exposed to harsh environmental conditions, including vacuums, solar ultraviolet radiation, micrometeoroids, space debris, atomic oxygen, and deep thermal cycles.
Compounding this problem is the fact that S/C are faced with additional complications including a micro-gravity environment, atmospheric drag, atomic oxygen that degrades spacecraft surfaces, a vacuum environment leading to outgassing and cold welding, micrometeoroids, and charged particles.
The wind of charged particles from the sun, as well as micrometeoroids that strike Mercury, lift particles from the surface and inject them into the exosphere and magnetosphere.
In the early days of the space program, naturally occurring micrometeoroids were the sole debris-related concern.