micrometeoroid

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Related to micrometeoroids: Micrometeorites

micrometeoroid

[¦mī·krō′mē·dē·ə‚rȯid]
(astronomy)
A very small meteoroid with diameter generally less than a millimeter.
References in periodicals archive ?
The two types of comets that these micrometeoroids are likely to be from are Jupiter-family comets and Halley-type comets.
And for insulation, inside the spacesuit a liner divides the gas-bag from the thermal micrometeoroid garment--made with five layers of aluminized Mylar (silver party-balloon material).
Thermal Micrometeoroid Garment works like a thermos to protect astronauts from the sun's rays.
The moon lacks the shield provided by even a thin planetary atmosphere, such as Mars, so lunar explorers will have to withstand the relentless bombardment of harmful solar radiation and pelting rain of micrometeoroids.
Astronomers have known since the Apollo era that our Moon has a very tenuous atmosphere created by the micrometeoroids that continuously rain onto the lunar surface.
One might even set a trap to catch micrometeoroids, but that seems pretty extreme when all you have to do is glimpse a sporadic meteor.
Showalter says the matching orbits indicate that the ringlet formed when micrometeoroids bombarded Pan, chipping off small bits of it.
On satellites, aerogels might serve as a gentle mitt for catching speeding micrometeoroids without shattering these relics of the solar system's beginning into a useless powder.
Others have studied particles trapped in Earth's magnetic field or collected micrometeoroids and other debris from the solar system's younger days.
By designing experiments to capture micrometeoroids and other small particles in stacks of thin foils, British physicists hope to learn about the size, velocity, composition and distribution of such particles.
In a paper submitted to NATURE, he instead proposes that the dust in the bands may have been generated by micrometeoroids colliding with "unseen moonlets," each about 200 meters across, in belts some tens of kilometers wide, as well as by collisions between the moonlets themselves.