microscopist


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Wikipedia.

microscopist

[mī′kräs·kə‚pist]
(science and technology)
An individual skilled in the use of the microscope.
References in periodicals archive ?
We predict that, over time, as computers gain more and more discriminatory abilities, they will reduce the amount of time it takes for a pathologist to render diagnoses and, in the process, reduce the demand for pathologists as microscopists, potentially enabling pathologists to focus more cognitive resources on higher-level diagnostic and consultative tasks (eg, integrating molecular, morphologic, and clinical information to assist in treatment and clinical management decisions for individual patients).
And through social media I've created a visual portfolio that not only showcases my abilities as a microscopist but also provides a medium for other scientists to share their work with the public.
I also learned how he was able to kill Borrelia using a replica of a machine made by French inventor George Lakhovsky and later adapted by American microscopist genius Royal Rife.
Some provincial malaria control programmes used to provide formal microscopist training, backed with regular refresher courses and a slide re-checking system to monitor quality, [14] but this is no longer done.
Special Malaria Mobile Squads were formed comprising Malaria Supervisors and Microscopists in each talukas of affected districts to carry out different activities.
Thus, the Dutch microscopist could provide a pertinent confirmation of the theory expounded earlier in the seventeenth century by William Harvey who, it is important to note in the present context, had also tested his theory on an impressive variety of specimens, albeit with little success.
This technique is not bereft of flaws, and it requires experience and intensive training on the part of the microscopist.
in Biology from Cornell while Roberta who studied at Berkeley is an electron microscopist.
His father was a Quaker, a wine merchant and a distinguished microscopist.
The retired Cardiff University microscopist said it was vital to immortalise the school and education in general in the museum.
There are also isolated examples in the period 1677-82, including two crucial meetings, one in November 1677 when Hooke confirmed the discovery by the Dutch microscopist, Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, of 'little animals' in pepper water, and the other when the Society had to respond to the crisis caused by Robert Boyle's refusal to act as President in December 1680.