microscopy

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microscopy

1. the study, design, and manufacture of microscopes
2. investigation by use of a microscope

microscopy

[mī′kräs·kə·pē]
(optics)
The interpretive application of microscope magnification to the study of materials that cannot be properly seen by the unaided eye.

microscopy

The use of microscopes to view ultra-small objects. Optical microscopes use a light source from below or to the side of the object being magnified. For example, in the medical field, there are numerous optical techniques, many of which require altering the samples being observed.

Scanning electron microscopes are able to magnify objects smaller than .2 micrometers, which is smaller than the wavelength of light. Scanning probe microscopes can image down to the molecular level (see AFM and STM).
References in periodicals archive ?
There are many hurdles to replacing the human microscopist with computer algorithms--some practical and some theoretical.
The competency of microscopists is therefore crucial for accurate diagnosis.
Microscopists tend to err on the conservative side in diagnosing TB in HIV co-infected cases.
Our job is made even easier by the fact that early microscopists paid attention to a great number of familiar phenomena.
Analysis of smears by APOPO's microscopists confirmed the presence of M.
Malaria parasite detection: Thick and thin blood smears were made from finger-prick samples, stained with 10 per cent Giemsa and examined under oil-immersion (100 x) by expert microscopists at Malaria Clinic in each study areas.
During the inspection of microscopists and laboratory activities at district/PHCs, it was also noted that the existing workload on the majority (>80%) of malaria microscopists is too high to allow correct examination and maintenance of records.
They were joined in the nineteenth century by chemists, biologists, microscopists, radiologists, and physicians, who branched out into criminal justice as well.
This book fills the gap, providing a thorough analysis of what the main concerns of the field were and how microscopists learned to communicate with each other in relevant ways in order to compare results and build a new discipline during the period from 1680 up to 1800.
Scanning" was launched in 1979 and is published six times a year for a controlled circulation of 3500 scanning electron microscopists.