microsociology


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microsociology

the level of sociological analysis in which the focus is on face-to-face interactions in everyday life, on behaviour in groups, etc. (see SYMBOLIC INTERACTIONISM, ETHNOMETHODOLOGY). While often concerned with understanding individual meanings (see MEANINGFUL UNDERSTANDING AND EXPLANATION), microsociology does not confine itself to particular forms of explanatory accounts. Compare MACROSOCIOLOGY.

Microsociology

 

one of the names given to a school in bourgeois sociology that arose in the 1920’s and that studies interaction in small groups as the basic model for all social relations. The term is usually applied to the theories of G. Gurvitch and J. Moreno. A more widely used term is “sociometry.”

References in periodicals archive ?
But for an account of how this novel exhibits a microsociology informed by game theory, see Mark Seltzer's essay "Playing Dead: Crime as a Social System," published in Crime Culture: Figuring Criminality in Fiction and Film (Continuum, 2011).
The new approach is founded on human rights, microsociology, and ideas from social construction.
Inside Social Life: Readings in Sociological Psychology and Microsociology.
Ingeniously combining the microsociology of Erving Goffman and Harvey Sacks with the critical theory of Foucault, Latour, Hacking, and others; written in compelling and clear prose; and thick with ethnographic detail, Bureaucrats & Bleeding Hearts is a must-read book for scholars interested in the state of indigenous care in Australia and the disciplinary nature of bureaucracies more generally.
As Bourdieu (1988, 1996) has astutely noted in many other contexts, careers are at stake here, and the microsociology of everyday life in this way contributes to the perpetuation of macrosocial structures of wealth and poverty as careers take their place among the vested interests supporting the current imbalance of trade.
Marriage and the construction of reality: An exercise in the microsociology of knowledge.
29) A microsociology of local actors, of their interests and strategies, is necessary to understand their different reactions when sanctions are imposed.
The symbolic anthropology championed by Victor Turner derives its analogies from theater, as does the microsociology of Erving Goffman.
However, their microsociology needs to be modified to take account of the affect theory of Silvan Tomkins and Donald Nathanson.
Winter (1985), "The Microsociology of Housing," Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Midwest Sociological Society, St.
366-383 in Inside Social Life: Readings in Sociological Psychology and Microsociology, ed.
Moreover, the book's intention is not only to pay attention to the microsociology of crime -- the interactional strategies and personal politics out of which a criminal event is constructed -- but to link this microsociology to a macrosociological analysis of "background factors" like social class and ethnicity.