middle ear

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Related to middle ears: Glue ear, Middle ear infection, Acute otitis media

middle ear

the sound-conducting part of the ear, containing the malleus, incus, and stapes

Middle Ear

 

in man and other terrestrial vertebrates, the part of the auditory system located between the external ear and the internal ear. The middle ear includes the air-filled tympanic cavity, which contains auditory ossicles and the auditory, or eusta-chian, tube. In man and some primates, it also includes mastoid cells. In most vertebrates, it is bounded on the outside by the tympanic membrane. The middle ear is separated from the internal ear by the cartilaginous or bony wall of the vestibule of the labyrinth. The auditory ossicles transmit sound vibrations from the tympanic membrane to the internal ear. In most animals, the middle ear is connected to the pharynx by the auditory tube. In many terrestrial vertebrates and especially in mammals it contains many additional structures that perform important acoustic functions. The middle ear is partly or completely reduced in many terrestrial and secondarily aquatic amphibians, in many mammals, and in some turtles and snakes.

middle ear

[′mid·əl ′ir]
(anatomy)
The middle portion of the ear in higher vertebrates; in mammals it contains three ossicles and is separated from the external ear by the tympanic membrane and from the inner ear by the oval and round windows.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly all the cases of NTM middle ear infection are caused by the Mfortuitum complex (which includes Mfortuitum, M chelonae, and M abscessus; 67%) or by the Mycobacterium avium complex (27%).
Entry of NTM into the middle ear is most probably by direct inoculation via the external ear canal.
Yet as the mouse middle ear forms, this tissue creates a swath of lining that patches the rupture, Tucker and colleague Hannah Thompson report in the March 22 Science.
Its patch in the middle ear tends to flake off when infected.
Because my eustachian tube on my right side had not been opening and closing as it should, there was a negative pressure in my middle ear and this negative pressure over time had caused my right eardrum to be sucked inward creating "retraction pockets.
Moody Antonio advised I have surgery to repair the eroded middle ear bones (ossicular reconstruction), and to use nearby cartilage and muscle tissue to reconstruct and strengthen the eardrum (tympanoplasty).
The problem of middle-ear disease starts when the Eustachian tube, which connects the middle ear and the back of the nose, becomes plugged.
Consequently, some 670,000 children a year wind up with tubes surgically implanted into the middle ear to keep it ventilated.