middle ground


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middle ground

[′mid·əl ′grau̇nd]
(navigation)
A shoal with a channel on either side of it in a navigable part of a river, port, or harbor.
References in periodicals archive ?
If our politicians would remember President Lincoln's guiding principle delivered 150 years ago at Gettysburg, namely "government of the people, by the people, for the people," they should be able to fashion a middle ground that can move America forward.
Deriving middle ground out of an extreme and rapidly changing terrain, it renders understandable the previously historically shocking.
Other early tours took in castles and hotel lounges and Middle Ground also staged six plays during a 10-week tour of the highlands and islands of Scotland.
And as the subtitle portends, we are to find a middle ground on hard cases, but the middle ground Roberts finds is more political than metaphysical.
You can't find a middle ground with people who are so far to the extreme right that finding common ground means being a conservative Republican,'' Nunez said.
Gragnani's article on the search to establish a middle ground in the abortion debate highlighted the "95-10 Initiative" of Democrats for Life (DFLA).
People either love the ads or hate them; there is no middle ground.
However, there is a middle ground, as described by Stephen H.
There is, however, no comparable moral equivalence in the case of the political ploy for a middle ground on abortion.
ANY mention of Margaret Thatcher will always invoke a reaction - like herself, there's no middle ground with our memories of Maggie
There is no middle ground between a living and dead fetus.

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