middle lamella


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Related to middle lamella: Primary cell wall

middle lamella

[′mid·əl lə′mel·ə]
(cell and molecular biology)
The layer of a cell wall that is derived from the phragmoplast.
References in periodicals archive ?
At a later stage of decay the adjacent walls break off, because of the fungal hyphae degrading middle lamella and the walls of axial parenchyma become disfigured [Fig 9] breaking them completely [Fig 9] creating space between the cells.
At a later stage the fiber cells are broken down in the region of the middle lamella (Fig 7-9) of adjacent cells, separating them and wall begins to show discoloration finally breaking down forming large spaces as mentioned by Simon et al [7-9,12,25]
Delignified and intact fibers were often found next to each other and clearly delimited along the middle lamella (Fig 7-9), which suggests that diffusion of the delignifying according Srebotnik and Messner investigates in 1994 [26]and Fuhr et als [8] in 2011.
Tracheids in the surface layers of peracetic-acid-treated boards tended to separate in the region of the compound middle lamella (the term "compound middle lamella" is used here to denote middle lamella proper plus the primary cell wall), but this was confined to the outer one to two layers that were probably most delignified (Fig.
Compared to control, the density of cell corner middle lamella is greater, presumably reflecting a greater penetration of [KMnO.
In addition, Figures 16 & 17 indicate that torus degradation can vary and can be especially pronounced in the central layer (or middle lamella region) of this thickening.
According to previous investigations, the pit membranes and middle lamella between cell walls are continuously eroded by bacteria during the formation of wetwood [6].
The greater volume and radial shrinkage in wetwood compared with healthy wood was supported by the theory that pectin, the main component of the middle lamella, is degraded by bacteria and the bonding between cells is weakened.
Weathered radial surfaces, that had been acrylic-topcoated, were found to have greater adhesion failure than did tangential surfaces due to reported greater degradation of radial faces during weathering, as seen in micrographs showing greater loss of middle lamella lignin from radial cell walls.
The tracheids in the surface layers of pretreated boards tended to separate in the region of middle lamella, (1), (2) being more severe in preweathered boards, (1) and this region of cells would be one distinct point of weakness if the coating did not penetrate sufficiently and also uniformly enough to stabilize this region.
They undertook the differential extraction of pectin from the middle lamella and cell wall regions.
The investigators used size exclusion chromatography analysis, carbohydrate analysis and uronic acid assay profiling of the collected fractions to determine the differences between the middle lamella and cell wall pectin.