middle latitude

middle latitude

[′mid·əl ′lad·ə‚tüd]
Also known as mid-latitude.
(geography)
A point of latitude that is midway on a north-and-south line between two parallels.
(navigation)
The latitude at which the arc length of the parallel separating the meridians passing through two specific points is exactly equal to the departure in proceeding from one point to the other by middle-latitude sailing.
References in periodicals archive ?
Muslims do not only live in middle latitude regions of mostly clear sky as was the case in the early years of Islam but also in high latitude regions where the moon can rarely be sighted, and in areas of high humidity and frequent rain.
335-349) provides a paleoenvironmental record preserved in middle latitude, high-mountain glaciers.
By 2050, the average annual flow in rivers and the availability of water will go up by between 10 and 40% in high latitude areas and in certain humid tropical areas, and drop by between 10 and 30% in certain dry, middle latitude and arid tropical areas, some of which are already short of water.
Coastal areas, particularly those on the western side of the middle latitude areas, tend to have narrower ranges of seasonal temperatures, whereas the interiors of continents in the middle and
p] rates 50-90% higher in tropical mountains than in middle latitude ones.
These eight scarps, with slopes as steep as 55 degrees, reveal new information about the internal layered structure of previously detected underground ice sheets in Mars' middle latitudes.
NASA explained that in Earth's atmosphere there are waves that send cold air from areas close to the poles toward the middle latitudes, and that can create or extinguish clouds.
Rebecca Lindsay, of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Association (NOAA), said: "This shift disrupts the atmospheric circulation patterns that connect the tropics with the middle latitudes, which in turn modifies the mid-latitude jet streams.
on page 40, part of this issue's coverage of climate change: "Already, in the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere, average temperatures are increasing at a rate that is equivalent to moving south about 10 meters (30 feet) each day.
Across Earth's oceans, powerful winds blow sea spray into the atmosphere, and at lower and middle latitudes this water is often enriched by organic matter produced by abundant phytoplankton.
That's especially true at the middle latitudes of the Northern Hemisphere in the month of June, when days are longest and prolonged evening and morning twilights reduce night to a minimum.