Midland

(redirected from midlanders)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

Midland,

town (1991 pop. 13,865), S Ont., Canada, on Georgian Bay, NW of Toronto. Midland is a port and has grain elevators and plants that manufacture textiles, cameras, optical goods, and other products. The Martyrs' Shrine, commemorating the deaths of five Jesuit priests who were among the eight North American martyrs canonized in 1930, and other remembrances of the early colonial period are nearby.

Midland.

1 City (1990 pop. 38,053), seat of Midland co., central Mich., in the Saginaw valley at the confluence of the Tittabawassee and Chippewa rivers; inc. 1887. Midland owes its development after 1890 to the Dow Chemical Company, whose corporate headquarters is there. Silicone products, chemicals, magnesium, and plastics are among the manufactures. Oil, coal, and salt are found in the area. The Dow Gardens Library and Center for Arts are in Midland, and Saginaw Valley State Univ. is in nearby University Center.

2 City (1990 pop. 89,443), seat of Midland co., W Tex., on the southern border of the Llano Estacado; inc. 1906. Midland has prospered partly because of its cattle ranches, but the city's reputation for spectacular wealth and its great spurt in population after 1940 resulted from the drilling of oil. Midland sits in the heart of the Permian Basin "oil patch" and has thus attracted numerous oil-company offices to the city. However, the city's growth slowed in the latter part of the 20th cent. Prefabricated metal buildings, oil field and transportation equipment, and paving materials are manufactured, and there is gas processing. A symphony orchestra, a planetarium, and a petroleum museum and hall of fame are in the city.

Midland

 

a city in the northern USA, in the state of Michigan. Population 35,000 (1970). A major center of the chemical industry; the city also produces light and rare metals, cement, and equipment for the chemical industry. Oil and table salt are extracted near Midland.

midland

a. the central or inland part of a country
b. (as modifier): a midland region
References in periodicals archive ?
Robert talks about the Industrial Revolution, which was propelled forwards by inventive Midlanders.
Veggie-shy Midlanders are shunning the healthy food
The findings came out of research carried out by insolvency trade body R3 and it also found two thirds (66 per cent) of West Midlanders think bank-k rupts should be treated differently according to their prior spending behav-v iour, and 67 per cent also think most people could avoid bankruptcy by reining in reckless spending.
Despite all of this, Midlanders are truly potty about their potty cats.
Paul Greville, Blain Leharte and Stephen Bardon kept the Midlanders in touch, and they narrowed the gap to two with Dan Carthy's 32ndminute goal.
Well Mr Brown, if you really want to hear the concerns of this West Midlander, then he's concerned that he is being patronised.
Baros knows he has frequently failed to deliver in league football - he has scored 26 goals in 45 games for his country - and he admits he has not prospered since joining the inconsistent Midlanders.
East Midlanders are the most responsible, taking the most breaks on long journeys, with 77pc having more than three breaks.
Byrne insists the Midlanders deserve their place in the top-flight next season - and can fulfil that ambition by even avoiding a relegation play-off.
It showed that only 38 per cent of East Midlanders cycled to work, while only 39 per cent of Welsh workers did so, and the figure for Scots was as low as 20 per cent.
PAYDAY loan popularity is on the slide - but over half of Midlanders are worried about debt.
Birmingham International Airport has announced record passenger figures for December but urged Midlanders to support their airport.

Full browser ?