Alytes

(redirected from midwife toad)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to midwife toad: Alytes obstetricans

Alytes

 

(obstetrical toads), a genus of acaudate amphibians of the family Discoglossidae. There are two species. A. obstetricans is distributed in Central Europe and the eastern part of the Iberian Peninsula. The body length reaches 5 cm. Egg laying and fertilization usually occur on dry land. The female lays two strings of eggs, each reaching a length of 1.7 m. Between 120 and 150 eggs are deposited. The male winds the strings of eggs around his hind legs and carries them for about a month, until the tadpoles hatch. The tadpoles develop further in the water, a process that sometimes lasts more than two years. The toad is nocturnal. It feeds mainly on insects. It burrows in the ground, sometimes making long passages in which it winters. A. cisternasii is found in western Spain and in Portugal.

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
The Mallorcan midwife toad was first discovered as a fossil in 1977; scientists concluded that the species had become extinct 2,000 years ago.
The Mallorcan midwife toad is the second species that Durrell Wildlife has helped to get downgraded on the Red List.
In Spain, ongoing chytridiomycosis-driven declines of midwife toads (Alytes obstetricans) and salamanders (Salamandra salamandra) have been documented since 1997 (4) and 1999 (5), respectively, and confirmed with scanning electron microscopy, histologic examination, and molecular detection methods (4,5).
Caption: Midwife toads on the island of Majorca kicked the lethal Bd infection were treated.
Washington, January 25 (ANI): A new research has suggested that midwife toads that live in the mountains are highly likely to die from a serious fungal infection, called chytridiomycosis, whereas their infected relatives in the lowlands are not.