Midwife

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Midwife

 

a person on the middle level of the medical staff, having completed medical school (a three-year course in the USSR), giving assistance to pregnant women in labor. Midwives are also responsible for “patronage,” that is, their presence and observation in the homes of pregnant women and mothers during the early postpartum period.

References in periodicals archive ?
Later in 2009 session, the bill was amended to call for a Scope of Practice Review on midwife practice.
International Confederation of Midwives (ICM)--Definition of the Midwife A midwife is a person who, having been regularly admitted to a midwifery educational program, duly recognized in the country in which it is located, has successfully completed the prescribed course of studies in midwifery and has acquired the requisite qualifications to be registered and/or legally licensed to practice midwifery.
The midwife is recognized as a responsible and accountable professional who works in partnership with women to give the necessary support, care and advice during pregnancy, labor and the postpartum period, to conduct births on the midwife's own responsibility and to provide care for the newborn and the infant.
The midwife has an important task in health counseling and education, not only for the woman, but also within the family and the community.
Senior midwife Mary Coakley, delivery suite services manager at the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff, claims the threat of violence is common on the ward too.
The senior midwife says Cardiff and the Vale Trust has a special counselling service for midwives who have been the victims of abuse, and trains them in how to deal with violence and aggression.
But clearly if a woman is in labour then a midwife has to attend so the police would go in with them if needed.