Midwife

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Midwife

 

a person on the middle level of the medical staff, having completed medical school (a three-year course in the USSR), giving assistance to pregnant women in labor. Midwives are also responsible for “patronage,” that is, their presence and observation in the homes of pregnant women and mothers during the early postpartum period.

References in periodicals archive ?
It is self-evident that educated and trained midwives, as all health professionals, need to be properly equipped to perform their lifesaving role," said Direct Relief President and CEO Thomas Tighe.
At present, there are 1,500 registered midwives practicing in the country.
With midwives at the heart of maternity care, I hope these awards will inspire midwives across the UK.
The Chief Nursing Officer, Mrs Charlotte McArdle said: "Despite the legislation, there has been confusion around midwives responsibilities in relation to the supply and administration of medicines, in particular around Midwives Exemptions, Patient Group Directions and relevant statutory legislation.
In the report, the commissioner stressed the importance of midwives behaving in a professional and objective manner while being caring towards their patients at the same time.
Ibrahim said greater responsibility needs to be given to midwives during birth.
She said hospital midwives also provided support in emergencies, helped with other procedures and assisted as second midwife at births.
The Regulation expressly limits the scope of the practice of midwifery as the primary health care provider to "normal" pregnancies, and mandates that midwives shall consult with physicians in accordance with the guidelines of the governing board if medical complications exist or arise during the course of midwifery care that may require management by a physician.
Jackie Smith, Chief Executive and Registrar of the NMC, said: 'Every nurse and midwife should be claiming tax relief on their annual registration fees and it is surprising that so few nurses and midwives are receiving what they are entitled to.
An Australian study found that while pregnant participants clearly understood that midwives were qualified to provide full maternity care, many women still requested a doctor at birth (Leen Ooi Boon, 2004).
Assistant director of infection prevention control and senior nurse Carole Hallam said: "Nurses and midwives provide a vital role, not just on hospital wards but out in the community.
Sheila Sugrue who is National Midwife Lead, Health Service Executive, Ireland and Senior Lecturer University College Dublin said easy accessibility to qualified midwives can be a great service offered by a public friendly government to its people.