micron

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micron:

see micrometermicrometer
. 1 Instrument used for measuring extremely small distances. Typical examples are devices used in astronomical telescopes to measure the apparent diameter of celestial objects and similar devices used in microscopes.
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Micron

 

a fractional unit of length equal to 10-6 m or 10-3 mm. Its symbol is μ. The name “micron” was abolished by a resolution of the Thirteenth General Conference on Weights and Measures (1967); according to GOST (All-Union State Standard) 7663–55 and the rule for formation of the names of fractional units, it is to be called the micrometer (Russian mikrometr).

micron

[′mī‚krän]
(mechanics)
A unit of pressure equal to the pressure exerted by a column of mercury 1 micrometer high, having a density of 13.5951 grams per cubic centimeter, under the standard acceleration of gravity; equal to 0.133322387415 pascal; it differs from the millitorr by less than one part in seven million. Also known as micrometer of mercury.

micron

A unit of length equal to a thousandth part of a millimeter or a millionth of a meter.

micron

i. A unit used to measure the effectiveness of filters. One micron is a micrometer, or one millionth of a meter (10−6).
ii. A unit of linear measurement equal to one millionth (10−6) of a meter. Also called a micrometer.
iii. The amount of pressure exerted by a column of mercury one-micrometer (one millionth of a meter) high under standard conditions. A micron of pressure is equal to .001 mm of mercury.

micron

a unit of length equal to 10--6 metre. It is being replaced by the micrometre, the equivalent SI unit

Micron

(1)

micron

(2)

micron

One micrometer, which is one millionth of a meter or approximately 1/25,000 of an inch. The tiny elements that make up a transistor on a chip are measured in micrometers and nanometers. See process technology.


Magnified 800 Times
This is an 800x magnification of a few bits of RAM from an early Motorola microcontroller. Although the actual size of what you see in this picture would fit on a pinhead, the elements in the devices on this chip are several microns wide, which is quite large by today's standards.
References in periodicals archive ?
Dirksen, "The Old Testament Peshitta," Mikra 261-97; Yeshayahu Maori, "The Peshitta Version of the Pentateuch in its Relation to the Sources of Jewish Exegesis" (Ph.
The proposed itinerary includes the Greek island of Lemnos where thousands of wounded and sick Allied soldiers were treated, many by the Australian Military Hospital operating on Lemnos between 1915 and 1916; the site of the wreck of the troop ship the Marquette New Zealand's military hospital, which was on board the ship, was en route to Solonika when the ship was torpedoed on October 23,1915; the Mikra British Cemetery in Thessaloniki, where the 10 New Zealand sisters who died when the Marquette sank are commemorated; and Anzac Cove on the Gallipoli Peninsula.
Here, "Israel sinned" translates into the halakhic principle that "one cannot base legal arguments on the text of Scripture, alone," into the hermeneutical principle that, although "no (scriptural) text can be deprived of its peshat" (eyn mikra yotse mide peshuto), nonetheless the scriptural text must be read critically if it is to bear its meaning for the religious Jew.
Moskowitz, in the Da'at Mikra series, concludes his lengthy interpretation of shefi by saying "and others explain 'on foot'.
This point is discussed by Binyamin Uffenheimer, [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] Bet Mikra 39 (1994): 97-132, at 104.
Earle Ellis, "Biblical Interpretation in the New Testament Church," in Mikra, edited by Martin Jan Mulder (Assen: Van Gorcum, 1988), pp.
See the discussion of this question in the Da'at Mikra commentary to I Kings 19:20.
See also "Bamot and Sanctuaries: From Arad to Dan," Beth Mikra 24 (1978): 94-105 (Hebrew).
In the Da'at Mikra edition of Psalms, Amos Hakham notes other evidence of material that was reworked to become a prayer for the future.
A Lexicographical Note II," Beit Mikra 146 (1996): 276-92; "Hebrew [LANGUAGE NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII], Akkadian saklu.