mile


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Related to mile: nautical mile

mile:

see English units of measurementEnglish units of measurement,
principal system of weights and measures used in a few nations, the only major industrial one being the United States. It actually consists of two related systems—the U.S.
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Mile

 

a measure of length used in the national nonmetric systems of units; now used mainly in navigation.

The USSR and most other countries use the nautical mile, which, according to the International Hydrographic Conference of 1929, is equal to 1.852 km, or the average length of 1’ of the arc of a meridian. One nautical mile is equal to 10 cable lengths.

In Great Britain 1 nautical mile equals 1.853184 km, and 1 statute land mile equals 1.609344 km (it is also used in the USA). A geographic mile (German) is equal to 1/15° of the equator, or 7.4204 km. The old Russian mile was equal to 7.46760 km; the old Roman mile, to 1.481 km.

mile

[mīl]
(mechanics)
A unit of length in common use in the United States, equal to 5280 feet, or 1609.344 meters. Abbreviated mi. Also known as land mile; statute mile.

mile

1. a unit of length used in the U.K., the US, and certain other countries, equal to 1760 yards. 1 mile is equivalent to 1.609 34 kilometres
3. See Swedish mile
4. any of various units of length used at different times and places, esp the Roman mile, equivalent to 1620 yards
References in classic literature ?
These led them to execute every diabolical scheme; and, on the fifteenth day of August, commanded a party of Indians and Canadians, of about five hundred in number, against Briant's station, five miles from Lexington.
Herbert Spencer, in his autobiography, alludes to the impressive fact that while the eye is reading a single line of type, the earth has travelled thirty miles through space.
But the cetacean grew warm itself, no doubt; for without straining itself, it made 19 3/10 miles.
It was now but 140 degrees, although we had penetrated to a depth of nearly four miles.
On the river, where was a packed trail and where snowshoes were unnecessary, the dogs averaged six miles an hour.
Through the glasses objects appeared to be only four miles distant.
Um do say, sir," says mine host, rising purple-faced, while the moan is still coming out of the Stwun, "as they used in old times to warn the country-side by blawing the Stwun when the enemy was a-comin', and as how folks could make un heered then for seven mile round; leastways, so I've heered Lawyer Smith say, and he knows a smart sight about them old times.
The next morning at dawn they espied the coast, and John Bunsby was able to assert that they were not one hundred miles from Shanghai.
Forty millions of miles it was from us--more than forty millions of miles of void.
The principal aim of his journey was to reconnoitre Lake Tchad, from which he was still three hundred and fifty miles distant.
But that native land was too far off, and for a man going a thousand miles it is absolutely necessary to set aside his final goal and to say to himself: "Today I shall get to a place twenty-five miles off where I shall rest and spend the night," and during the first day's journey that resting place eclipses his ultimate goal and attracts all his hopes and desires.
The strata are of sandstone, and one layer was remarkable from being composed of a firmly- cemented conglomerate of pumice pebbles, which must have travelled more than four hundred miles, from the Andes.