milkiness

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milkiness

A white, semiopaque discoloration in a clear varnish film.
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Jon Holmes, Founder and Managing Director of Milky Tea, says the response from gamers has been overwhelming.
This is what we generally see in the night sky as "the Milky Way" and that's where our galaxy found its name.
The Milky Way consists of roughly 100 billion stars that form a huge stellar disk with a diameter of 100-200 thousand light years.
This galaxy gives off only one-tenth as much light as the Milky Way.
Although all of the individual stars that can be seen in the entire sky with the naked eye are part of the Milky Way Galaxy,[24] the light in this band originates from the accumulation of un-resolved stars and other material when viewed in the direction of the Galactic plane.
Astronomers used Hubble's deep-sky surveys to study the evolution of 400 galaxies similar to the Milky Way and noted their appearance at various stages of development over a time span of 11 billion years.
Visitors to Gulfood 2012 are invited to sample the new Milky Lux range during the Gulfood 2012 tradeshow, in booth M-114, Sheikh Maktoum Hall.
NGC 6744 would almost be an identical twin of the Milky Way, were it not for its size.
Milky Way galaxy, the home galaxy of the Solar System, and of Earth, belongs to a rare subset among the billions that populate the cosmos and just four percent of galaxies are similar to our Milky Way, according to a new research.
Caption: MILKY WAY--An Iranian photographer has won second place in an American photo contest with this picture of the Milky Way seen in the sky above Esfahan.
Leading South African franchise operator Famous Brands has acquired the franchise agreements, trademarks and intellectual property of Milky Lane, the nation's soft-serve ice cream category leader from its current owner Java Brands.
A TEAM of scientists from the UK and the US has discovered a galaxy far away from us which is churning out stars 250 times faster than our Milky Way.