millipede

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Related to milliped: centipede bite

millipede

(mĭl`əpēd'), elongated arthropod having many body segments and pairs of legs. Millipedes, sometimes termed thousand-legged worms, have two pairs of legs on each body segment except the first few and the last. Females in one Californian species, Illacme plenipes, typically have more 650 legs, but are only 1.3 in. (33 mm) long; the leggiest ever found (1926) had 750. The millipede body is nearly circular in cross section. Most temperate region millipedes are rather small and dull in appearance, but a few tropical species are brightly colored, and some reach 1 ft (30 cm) in length.

Millipedes do not have a poisonous bite, but many protect themselves by offensive odors produced by stink glands; some produce highly irritating compounds that can injure the skin or eyes of attackers; and some can roll up into a ball or spiral for protection. They are widely distributed in temperate and warmer regions, living in surface litter, under stones or logs, and in relatively humid surroundings. They feed mostly on decaying vegetation, although some will consume decaying animal food. Some species attack plant roots and cause crop damage.

Centipedescentipede,
common name for members of a single class, Chilopoda, of the phylum Arthropoda. Centipedes are the most familiar of the myriapodous arthropods, which consist of five groups of arthropods that had a separate origin from other arthropods.
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, with which millipedes are often confused, are carnivorous, have a single pair of legs on each segment, and a body that is flat in cross section. Millipedes belong to the phylum ArthropodaArthropoda
[Gr.,=jointed feet], largest and most diverse animal phylum. The arthropods include crustaceans, insects, centipedes, millipedes, spiders, scorpions, and the extinct trilobites.
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, class Diplopoda.

millipede

[′mil·ə‚pēd]
(invertebrate zoology)
The common name for members of the arthropod class Diplopoda.

millipede

, millepede, milleped
any terrestrial herbivorous arthropod of the class Diplopoda, having a cylindrical body made up of many segments, each of which bears two pairs of walking legs
References in periodicals archive ?
This milliped has been reported from northeastern Texas in Camp, Lamar, Nacogdoches, Sabine, and Smith counties (Stewart, 1969).
Discovery of the milliped, Auturus louisianus louisianus (Chamberlin, 1918), in Texas (Diplopoda: Polydesmida: Euryuridae).
Discovery of the milliped, Tiganogona brownae Chamberlin (Diplopoda: Chordeumatida: Cleidogonidae) in central Oklahoma; westernmost records for the family and genus.
Branneria bonoculus (Diplopoda: Chordeumatida: Brannerioidea): new to the milliped fauna of Texas.
This milliped is the most highly cave-adapted of any of the Indiana species of Pseudotremia and is primarily an inhabitant of riparian habitat where it occurs on mudbanks adjacent to cave streams.
This milliped occurs in riparian habitats as well as streamless cave habitats like pit floors, particularly on rotting wood.
This milliped is an exotic of uncertain origin, although indications are that it probably came from Japan.
a second species in the North American milliped family Branneriidae (Diplopoda: Chordeumatida: Brannerioidea).
This milliped was previously known from Colorado and New Mexico, and Hudspeth, Potter, and Randall counties, Texas (Shelley 2000).
This milliped was previously reported from Bandera (Loomis 1959) and Bexar and Kerr counties (Shelley 2001).
Aniulus garius (Chamberlin, 1912), a widespread milliped in central and eastern North America (Julida: Parajulidae: Aniulini).
Between October 2001 and May 2003, locations (primarily in State Parks) within 24 Texas counties (Bosque, Bowie, Brown, Cass, Coryell, Dallas, Delta, Fannin, Freestone, Harrison, Hopkins, Jack, Johnson, Limestone, Marion, Morris, Parker, Red River, Shackleford, Somervell, Taylor, Titus, Tom Green and Travis) and Caddo Parish, Louisiana, were examined for millipeds in general and eurymerodesmids in particular.