milliwatt

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milliwatt

[′mil·ə‚wät]
(mechanics)
A unit of power equal to one-thousandth of a watt. Abbreviated mW.

milliwatt

One thousandth of a watt. See watt and dBm.
References in periodicals archive ?
By comparison, an iPhone 3G charger might draw about 2 watts, or 2,000 milliwatts.
Those devices, which record data 200 times each second on small, rotating disk drives, need about 600 milliwatts of power.
The company announced continuous wave (CW) lifetime in excess of 100 hours with an operating output power of 1 to 3 milliwatts.
The CS42L52 utilizes a 40-pin QFN package and consumes only 13 milliwatts of power at 1.
The Au1500 processor is a MIPS32(TM) technology-based system on a chip (SOC) processor, and is available at speeds of 333MHz, 400MHz and 500MHz speeds, with power dissipations of less than 400 milliwatts, 700 milliwatts and 1.
For certain kinds of optical fibers, heat-initiated damage can occur when the visible-light laser power transmitted along the fiber is as low as 4 milliwatts, less than the power of a small flashlight.
Until now, fast-time-to-market, low cost solutions have been designed for speed, costing hundreds of milliwatts standby power, prohibiting handheld applications.
When operated at data rates of a few megabits per second, Millipede is expected to consume about 100 milliwatts, which is in the range of flash memory technology and considerably below magnetic recording.
An output of over 700 milliwatts at 636 nanometers under continuous operation was obtained from a high performance, strained-layer, quantum well, diode laser.
When exposed to a mixture of air and hydrogen at room temperature, the device develops a potential difference of roughly 1 volt between its electrodes and generates a few milliwatts of power per square centimeter.
The new 20-micron hydrocarbon membrane, when used in direct methanol fuel cells (DMFC) being developed for micro power applications such as notebook computers and cell phones, produces an unprecedented 200 milliwatts of peak power per square centimeter of material at 70C -- a level which allows for a significant reduction in the size, weight and cost of the fuel cell "stack", a key component in the fuel cell system.