mimetic


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Related to mimetic: mimetic desire

mimetic

Biology of or exhibiting mimicry

mimetic

[mə′med·ik]
(crystallography)
Pertaining to a crystal that is twinned or malformed but whose crystal symmetry appears to be of a higher grade than it actually is.
(petrology)
Of a tectonite, having a deformation fabric, formed by mimetic crystallization, that reflects and is influenced by preexisting anisotropic structure.
(zoology)
Pertaining to or exhibiting mimicry.
References in periodicals archive ?
This search led him not only to Girard but also to Balthasar, and his 1990 book, later translated as Jesus in the Drama of Salvation, constitutes a novel synthesis of Balthasar's dramatic project and Girard's mimetic theory applied to the Gospels.
Denying the possibility of a general answer to questions like these, Girard observes: "writers are always different in their coping with mimetic mechanism.
In his other works (Deceit, Desire and the Novel [1961] and Things Hidden Since the Foundation of the World [1978], for example), Girard has always maintained that his mimetic theory is not his own, that he did not invent it or systematize it; he merely read the great masters--Dante, Cervantes, Shakespeare, Dostoevsky, and Proust--and learned about the mimetic desire from their literary creations.
But regardless of the particular example chosen or its content, Weiss makes it plain that all recordings are indeed mimetic, whether they acknowledge this or not.
Real mimetic eggs were less likely to be rejected than real eggs that differed in spotting pattern from those in the nest ([chi square] = 24.
This is yet another demonstration of ProMetic's ability to develop high- performance purification materials derived from its Mimetic Ligand(TM) platform technology and one of several new affinity products we have developed for our commercial partners over the last 12 months", said Dr.
Abrams 'claimed that attention to mimetic representation was replaced during the romantic period by an expressive mode of creativity in the arts' (p.
Aware of the perilously unstable nature of imperial identity, she focuses on a series of very revealing mimetic transactions.
Masterful abstractionist that she is, Brown avoided descriptive or mimetic gesture for them.
Mimetic theory, as it has germinated following the work of Rene Girard, can provide some further tools to analyze and interweave the historical fragments in order to discern wider systemic patterns at work.
pressed into mighty service by society, the mimetic faculty carries out its honest labour suturing nature to artifice and bringing sensuousness by means of what was once called sympathetic magic, granting copy the character and power of the original, the representation the power of the represented'.
T]he mimetic status quo," he argues, "stopped being taken seriously" in art-music circles, and "by the middle of our century, only popular songs and film music dare to be frankly mimetic" (pp.