mimetic

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mimetic

Biology of or exhibiting mimicry

mimetic

[mə′med·ik]
(crystallography)
Pertaining to a crystal that is twinned or malformed but whose crystal symmetry appears to be of a higher grade than it actually is.
(petrology)
Of a tectonite, having a deformation fabric, formed by mimetic crystallization, that reflects and is influenced by preexisting anisotropic structure.
(zoology)
Pertaining to or exhibiting mimicry.
References in periodicals archive ?
The destruction of the victim's physical body mimetically through the use of the cakatu represents a physical and metaphysical enactment of slavery.
Except in this case the brand was the same each side; or at least mimetically.
Rather, they mimetically appear in theatrical episodes across sacred time and space.
In such conditions, innovation will be adopted mimetically since adoption by the first adopters will be interpreted as an act from which they draw benefit in accordance with the information available (Greve and Taylor, 2000).
She has already intoned the goat-song, mimetically sacrificed the goat, what else remains for her to do?
progress and development could only be achieved by mimetically copying the West.
We fall mimetically into joy from the joy we see' (279)--the joy of enjoying knowledge for its own sake; 'et hoc dicimus Deum' (sic) ('and this we call God', 281).
Here representation is used by Gregory in the double sense of politically standing in for and mimetically manifesting something.
A reader does not, in Adorno's model of reading, reduce artwork to an object to be mastered, but rather comports mimetically "to lose himself, forget himself, extinguish himself in the artwork.
Perhaps "a mirror trap" cautions the reader against engaging with this music too mimetically.
The limit of sensibility is mimetically evoked by the closure of the beacon's eye and the resultant confusion between aural and visual sense perception: we hear the "booms, rumors, and guttural sucks" as we are "watching the blinded waves"; the sea's sense is "veiled" (a visual effect) "as voices" (an aural one).
Both writers substantiate their studies of the force of the imagination by reviewing the more familiar instances of mimetically and sympathetically transferred somatic experience.