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mind

1. the human faculty to which are ascribed thought, feeling, etc.; often regarded as an immaterial part of a person
2. intelligence or the intellect, esp as opposed to feelings or wishes
3. (in Cartesian philosophy) one of two basic modes of existence, the other being matter

mind

the mental faculties, mental experience of the human individual, involving self-consciousness, ‘free will’, thinking processes and unconscious processes. It is a hypothetical, and sometimes metaphysical, construct, which expresses a holistic capacity based on the neurophysiological processes of the brain, yet additively becoming more than these, i.e. an emergent property. Philosophically, there are disagreements about the way to express these properties. Major disputes have existed on the mind-body relation, on whether or not mind and body are to be conceptualized as separate ‘immaterial’ and ‘material’ realms (See DUALISM. MATERIALISM). Related debates (in PSYCHOLOGY) surround the doctrine of BEHAVIOURISM, that scientific psychology can proceed only by analysis of overt behaviour, not mental events. It should be noted, however, that doctrines such as philosophical materialism, which reject a dualism of mind and body, are not necessarily committed to a denial of ‘emergent properties’ of mind for many explanatory purposes. See also STRATIFICATIONAL MODEL OF SOCIAL ACTION AND CONSCIOUSNESS.

mind

[mīnd]
(psychology)
The sum total of the neural processes which receive, code, and interpret sensations, recall and correlate stored information, and act on it.
The state of consciousness.
The understanding, reasoning, and intellectual faculties and processes considered as a whole.
The psyche, or the conscious, subconscious, and unconscious considered together.
References in periodicals archive ?
Now if a person's mind emerges from a network of individual elements (such as neurons and synapses) that have no independent cognition, why cannot the process be repeated on a higher level, so that the networked minds of many people will produce a higher mind--the social mind of Middlemarch?
Levine has developed and refined an accurate and usable framework of the mind and its functions.
The solution to this harmful separation between the mind and the music, then, is to continue to think the music as we play, it.
If you opened up a modern mind with a saw," he said in 1990, "things would tumble out in every direction.
His specialty is ``basic braining,'' and his mind serves as a kind of tutorial.
What is striking about The Conservative Mind, however, is how little these pivotal issues of the period figure in Kirk's "essay in definition.
Everybody at Minds Eye started having kids at the same time, and so we all started watching kids' television," DeWalt explains.
Will stores have remote scanners that read the minds and moods of incoming customers?
His last meditative paragraph here on the secular mind that is ever and dangerously intent on mastery could serve as its opening lines: "One prays at the very least on behalf of one's kind, though unsure, in a secular sense, to whom or what such prayer is directed, other than, needless to say, one's own secular mind, ever needy of an 'otherness' to address through words become acts of appeal, of worried alarm, of lively and grateful expectation: please, oh please, let things go this way, and not in that direction -- the secular mind given introspective, moral pause, its very own kind of sanctity" (188--89).
So how do today's Best Minds compare, including those in the public policy arena?
On the contrary, for Berkeley, as for Johnson, the active, creative mind continuously shapes and reshapes the world by perceiving it.
It's politically incorrect for people to alter their minds and politically incorrect to provide a market that lets them do it.