mineral dust


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mineral dust

A very finely divided mineral product, the greatest bulk of which will pass through a 74-micron (No. 200) sieve; the most common such material is pulverized limestone.
References in periodicals archive ?
Small airways disease and mineral dust exposure: prevalence, structure, and function.
Although large storms can export vast amounts of mineral dust to the open ocean, the amount of sulfur dioxide required to acidify these large plumes and generate bioavailable iron is about five to 10 times higher than the average .
Capable of manufacturing pallets, rubber products, sheets, floor tiles, and a wide variety of other products using materials such as waste plastics, sawdust, mineral dust, flyash, and rubber.
The researchers performed in-situ measurements of cloud ice crystal residues and found that half were mineral dust and about a third were made up of inorganic ions mixed with nitrogen, phosphorus and carbon, the signature elements of biological matter.
Mineral dust from stone quarries induced cytotoxicity and IL-6 release in A549 cells (Hetland et al.
The accumulation of mineral dusts in lung parenchyma, causing pneumoconiosis, is a well-known occupational hazard.
The table specified mineral dust in the standard, but since organic dust was not mentioned, a later court held that nuisance dust did not apply to wood dust.
In particular, light absorption by aerosol particles such as mineral dust and black carbon (BC; thought to be the second strongest contribution to current global warming after CO2) is of fundamental importance from a climate perspective because the presence of absorbing particles (1) contributes to solar radiative forcing, (2) heats absorbing aerosol layers, (3) can evaporate clouds and (4) change atmospheric dynamics.
It's well known that particles in the atmosphere such as mineral dust, pollen, heavy metals and even bacteria can act as seeds for the nucleation of ice crystals.
One major supply line for mineral dust begins when wind, water, and severe changes in temperature join forces to erode large stones into smaller ones.
As early as 1984, the railroad conducted tests which revealed that some workers were being exposed to mineral dust containing silica which were more than twice the permissible exposure levels established by OSHA.
The second instrument is the Cloud-Aerosol Transport System (CATS), a laser instrument that will measure clouds and the location and distribution of airborne particles such as pollution, mineral dust, smoke, and other particulates in the atmosphere.