Minuscule

(redirected from miniscule)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Minuscule

 

an ancient and medieval Latin and Greek, including Byzantine, handwriting style consisting of minuscules, or lowercase letters. Minuscule developed from the cursive hand of the late eighth century. Minuscules in the Latin alphabet include the Caroline minuscule of the late eighth to 15th centuries and the Gothic minuscule of the 12th to 15th centuries. The Greek cursive of the ninth and tenth centuries is a minuscule script based on the Greek alphabet. From the 13th century both majuscule and minuscule letters were used in the Latin script, serving different functions.

References in periodicals archive ?
With miniscule budgets they are able to insert referrals into private conversations, position brands in consumers' minds, enhance corporate images, and ring the registers.
In the interview, Kulkarni describes Sequence's business model and the growing challenges facing his customers creating miniscule chips with hundreds of millions of transistors.
The company's advanced power management architecture enables the operation of sensors and radios off miniscule amounts of available energy.
The miniscule size, extreme accuracy, and low power consumption of our biosensor makes embedding it into new and existing electronics easy," added Huang.
2 billion buying goods online, this represents a miniscule 1.
The heat alters the surface tension, causing miniscule amounts of fluid to migrate from cooler to warmer areas through thermocapillary action.
After being processed into food products, usually involving heat and/or pressure, the remaining miniscule amount of THC drops to virtually undetectable levels and cannot lead to intoxication.
The miniscule losses that the pools have incurred so far, along with their potentially more significant but still limited losses in the future, demonstrate the strong credit performance of CMBS, the article says.
Transistors are the miniscule on/off switches that make up the integrated circuits in today's microprocessors.
At its foundation is the manipulation of matter on the nanoscale -- between 1 and 100 nanometers, miniscule even compared to today's sub-micron IC technology -- with the aim of producing new, more powerful electronics.
The paper of the envelopes containing a contaminated product has some humidity in it, even if the amount is miniscule, and therefore can be energized by the application of microwaves to produce the heat necessary to kill bacteria.