minuet


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minuet

(mĭnyo͞oĕt`), French dance, originally from Poitou, introduced at the court of Louis XIV in 1650. It became popular during the 17th and 18th cent. In 3–4 meter and moderate tempo, the minuet was performed by open couples who made graceful and precise glides and steps. The minuet left a refined but definite imprint on music; it is found in the operatic sinfonias of Alessandro Scarlatti and appears frequently as a movement in the symphonies and sonatas of Haydn and Mozart.

Minuet

 

a French dance, which developed from a folk dance from the province of Poitou. The minuet became a courtly dance in the second half of the 17th century and then spread throughout Europe as a ballroom dance (in Russia, it was introduced by Peter I). It is marked by smooth, majestic movements, consisting primarily of bows and curtsies. The dance is in 3/4 time. In the 18th century the minuet acquired variations: the tempo was quickened, movements became more complicated, and the dance took on affected features.

Early examples of minuets appear in J. B. Lully’s ballets for operas, F. Couperin’s clavier music, G. F. Handel’s overtures to oratorios, and Handel’s and J. S. Bach’s orchestral and instrumental suites. Mozart gave the minuet exuberance and vitality. Gradually it was transformed into the scherzo (for example, in works by Beethoven). The minuet is rarely encountered in works from the late 19th century and early 20th (Debussy, Ravel, Fauré, Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev).

S. P. PANKRATOV

minuet

1. a stately court dance of the 17th and 18th centuries in triple time
2. a piece of music composed for or in the rhythm of this dance, sometimes as a movement in a suite, sonata, or symphony

Minuet

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References in periodicals archive ?
While we can never know to what extent she was conscious of or deliberate in her use of musical form as an organizing principle in her writing, we can see the influence of the minuet in Pride and Prejudice.
indicating that from 1717 to 1775 minuets were danced both fast and slow, anywhere between MM 53 and 80 per bar,(5) is it really likely that it was only during the 1780s that musicians of the time just happened to slow down the minuet, playing only the bottom side of minuet tempos and not the top side-then to speed up again afterwards by the 1790s and 1800?
The Avastar 88W8887 was selected to power Frontier Silicons Minuet connected audio modules featuring Google Cast technology for audio devices.
The necessary freedom of expression of the left hand can be the focus of attention when studying the Minuet in B-flat Major, BWV 118.
The minuet is a genuinely danceable one, Melnikov's fortepiano playing here is splendid, and one can imagine carpets rolled back and couples whirling around the drawing room.
It will never, never be won" Film director Oliver Stone "I got taught the minuet at school.
We have a short waltz, a "secret," a birthday song, a spring song, a minuet, a march of the garden gnomes, a lullaby, a Bulgarian dance, a "caravan," a "Mozart" dance (another minuet), a "joyous surprise," and a jazzy stroll on the beach.
Pink three-quarter sleeve dress pounds 90 by Minuet @ Frasers, patent court shoes pounds 40@Miss Selfridge
Washington, April 21 (ANI): Scientists at the Cambridge University, UK, have discovered that freshwater algae can form stable groupings in which they dance around each other, resembling forms like waltz and minuet.
The new Gehry-designed playspace will be part of the larger renaissance of the Battery, including the flourishing Battery Bosque Gardens; two new gourmet "green" and organic food kiosks; a Battery Bikeway connecting Manhattan's East and West sides; a new Town Green; renovations to Peter Minuet Plaza; and the planned restoration and expansion of historic Castle Clinton.
This recording includes a third trio section in the second minuet, a section not universally attributed to Mozart but certainly a welcome addition here nevertheless.