minute

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minute

1. a period of time equal to 60 seconds; one sixtieth of an hour
2. a unit of angular measure equal to one sixtieth of a degree.

minute

[′min·ət]
(mathematics)
A unit of measurement of angle that is equal to ¹⁄₆₀ of a degree. Symbolized ′. Also known as arcmin.
(mechanics)
A unit of time, equal to 60 seconds.

minute

One division of a module, 3.
References in periodicals archive ?
The delicacy and minuteness of the stitches were such that it almost seemed not to be the work of a human.
Causes of interobserver disagreement in the diagnosis of HGPIN were attributed mainly to differences in the visual estimation of the nucleoar size, but also to the minuteness or focal distribution of HGPIN, partial glandular involvement, the flat variant of HGPIN missed on low- or intermediate-power examination, and confusion with basal cell hyperplasia and/or inflammatory changes in which nucleoli are increased in size.
Each subject is dissected with considerable minuteness, the bones, the blood vessels, nerves and other organs being so studied as to give .
32][ As Kathleen Tillotson has observed, "It is Mercutio's] speech, with its precise and practical specification of minuteness, that is the true parent not only of Nimphidia, but of the fairy wedding in The Muses Elizium.
I was having some sort or spiritual experience, sensing my own minuteness in a clash of thousands amidst walls of towers reaching to the skies.
I admired the softness of her baby hair and the minuteness of her baby nails but I waited in vain for a sudden rush of maternal longing.
The issue of minuteness of quantity doesn't matter.
Because of their minuteness and high surface-to-volume ratio, the microspheres become incorporated with the resin almost instantly, while beads require several seconds.
As Ferrari suggests, then, the Canella family "sought, with the richness and minuteness of details, to push the nameless man toward a retrieval of his mnemonic patrimony, lost or buried in his unconscious" (Ferrari 39).
The attempt to associate the Holy Family with the meanest details of a carpenter's shop, with no conceivable omission of misery, of dirt, and even disease, all finished with the same loathsome minuteness, is disgusting.