misericord


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misericord

, misericorde
1. a ledge projecting from the underside of the hinged seat of a choir stall in a church, on which the occupant can support himself while standing
2. Christianity
a. a relaxation of certain monastic rules for infirm or aged monks or nuns
b. a monastery where such relaxations can be enjoyed

misericord

1. In monastic architecture, a room or separate building where monastic rule was relaxed.
2. Same as miserere.
References in periodicals archive ?
Chunko-Dominguez helps modern art historians understand how to read and understand medieval English Gothic misericord carvings.
14) Examples in the visual arts range from the very simple--an orb, normally with the cross on the top, is inverted, symbolizing the world literally upside down, carved on a misericord in the St.
with so much sweetness and love he awaited that soul that had left the body, with the eye of misericord turned toward him, when he came to enter the side, bathed in his [Niccolo's] blood, which was worth the blood of the Son of God
Obliged to stand for several hours, the misericord provided them with a little wooden ledge on which to lean, and yet to remain upright.
The work is not a complete survey of surviving misericord carvings in England, but provides an informative and entertaining overview of the nonfoliate images, and offers an insight into their meaning.
The misericord choir stalls, best of only three surviving probably friary sets, languish damp and neglected in the Old Grammar School.
And who knows, perhaps Mr Golding may even have a misericord in stock at an affordable price.
There are also further links to Halesowen Abbey for the remarkable misericords that are a feature of the choir house are believed to have been rescued from the abbey, whose abbot was the patron of Walsall church, at the time of the Dissolution.
The two misericords - ornately carved wooden seats - were snatched a year ago.
The presence of seals, coins, pilgrimage badges, and misericords is a useful reminder of how rarely these items are discussed and how frequently they are skated over in general survey courses or in specialized research.
Two-thirds of the stalls in which those priests sat (with carved, load-bearing misericords beneath) still survive today, one set painted with the figures of prophets, one set with apostles.
The baroque facades and soaring spires of cathedrals, the carmines and cobalts of stained-glass windows with the sun streaming through them, devotional processions and carnival parades, gargoyles, misericords, miraculous relics--all attested that there was an intangible reality beyond the physical one, a reality that could at most be suggestively delineated in extraordinary sights.