fortune

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fortune

a power or force, often personalized, regarded as being responsible for human affairs; chance
References in classic literature ?
Here was held another short but earnest consultation, during which the horses, to whose panic their owners ascribed their heaviest misfortune, were led from the cover of the woods, and brought to the sheltered spot.
He telleth it always in the third person, making believe he is too modest to glorify himself -- maledictions light upon him, misfortune be his dole
It was said that ill luck of one kind or another always overtook any one who had the misfortune to hear that song.
Misfortune has broken my once haughty spirit; I yield, I submit; 'tis my fate.
Oh, we don't mind it at all, madam; in our case it was merely misfortune, and nobody's fault.
He once recited three thousand verses without stopping; but the strain upon his mental faculties was too great, and he was little better than an idiot from that day forth -- a grievous misfortune for the school, for on great occa- sions, before company, the superintendent (as Tom expressed it) had always made this boy come out and "spread himself.
Adorable Princess," said Aladdin to her, accosting her, and saluting her respectfully, "if I have the misfortune to have displeased you by my boldness in aspiring to the possession of so lovely a creature, I must tell you that you ought to blame your bright eyes and charms, not me.
The misfortune of your birth ought to make you particularly careful as to your associates.
I am still ignorant whether I am to interpret the 'family misfortunes' which have set up this barrier between us, as meaning the misfortune for which her parents alone are to blame, or the misfortune of her having such a woman as Mrs.
And if your misfortune should prove to be one of those that refuse admission to any sort of consolation, it was my purpose to join you in lamenting and mourning over it, so far as I could; for it is still some comfort in misfortune to find one who can feel for it.
A plot of this kind would, doubtless, satisfy the moral sense, but it would inspire neither pity nor fear; for pity is aroused by unmerited misfortune, fear by the misfortune of a man like ourselves.
The ship drew on and had safely passed the strait, which some volcanic shock has made between the Calasareigne and Jaros islands; had doubled Pomegue, and approached the harbor under topsails, jib, and spanker, but so slowly and sedately that the idlers, with that instinct which is the forerunner of evil, asked one another what misfortune could have happened on board.