misogyny

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Related to misogynism: misogynistic

misogyny

[mi′säj·ə·nē]
(psychology)
Hatred of women.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this conclusion Pope dissolves all the wifely frustration at having to compete with a horse into the traditional misogynism of the insatiable female.
I think a lot them are probably indulging in a bit of misogynism,''he says.
In other words, a general misogynism is alive and well in the US, despite feminist advances.
Finally, the language of racism and misogynism is used to characterize and indict the whole human race.
Schoenberg's writings from his early years are full of outright misogynism.
Barbara Littlewood, a sociology lecturer at Glasgow University, said: "We could observe that quite a lot of male designers are gay or unmarried, but I don't know whether you could link that with misogynism and the idea that male designers are getting their own back on women.
Complicit in all the ills of the Westracism, fascism, misogynism, elitism-modernism has come to represent to us contemporaries the kind of bogey that Victorianism was to the modernists.
This episode possibly reflected seventeenth-century misogynism, if not in its origins at least in the author's and actors' acceptance of the scene.
In this their assessment is quite valuable; texts like C[acute{o}]rdoba's lack the vitriolic misogynism of other treatises on women from the period.
In contrast to the popular and alluring, but false, view that the acceptance of women in the sciences has proceeded uniformally with time, reaching its zenith with the present, the Rayner-Canhams repeatedly point out that although World Wars I and II dramatically increased employment opportunities for women in defense industries and on college campuses, the work was usually unskilled, routine, and temporary; with the termination of these conflicts the demobilized men expected to resume their former positions, and the usual misogynism and discrimination against women in science returned and even intensified.
Although they reacted with leniency to the excessive stringencies of the Dead Sea sects that preceded them, for instance in the realm of ritual purity, and though they did not embrace the rampant misogynism of Philo, the first-century Hellenistic Jewish philosopher, neither did they adopt some of the more advanced provisions of Roman law.
Pykett examines explicit commentaries on gender anxiety ranging from the misogynism of Otto Weininger's Sex and Character to the utopianism of social-purity feminists; more broadly-based social critiques such as Max Nordau's Degeneration; and calls for renovation such as Baden Powell's manifesto for masculine imperialism (and against degenerative feminization) in Scouting for Boys.