misology


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misology

[mi′säl·ə·jē]
(psychology)
Unreasoning aversion to intellectual or literary matters, or to argument or speaking.
References in periodicals archive ?
If they ever allow themselves to question this beautiful narrative, they will be exposed to the most intractably unpleasant vision of the world, and their only defense against such exposure would be the first form of misology, a refusal to question the truth of the myth of progress.
In the second section, we saw how a culture that rejects the philosophic validity of inspiring stories will, when it thinks dialectically, be forced to either accept a position that seems utterly absurd, or else to escape this apparently absurd position by rejecting either the validity of philosophy or the validity of the concept of justice, misology or misanthropy.
Misology and misanthropy arise from similar causes.
The hasty generalization common to misanthropy and misology blurs the line between health and degeneracy so profoundly that one no longer distinguishes between them.
This view shows up first in the context of the misology passage, where Socrates refers to those "contradiction-mongers" [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] who, because they have cultivated the skill of devising contradictory arguments to any thesis whatsoever, have come to think that "there is nothing sound or secure whatever, either in things or in arguments [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]; but that all realities are carried up and down, just like things fluctuating in the Euripus.
Indeed, in the misology passage Socrates urges his interlocutors to draw exactly the distinction between possible deficiencies in our manner of apprehending an argument and the status of that argument itself.