felony

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felony

(fĕl`ənē), any grave crime, in contrast to a misdemeanormisdemeanor,
in law, a minor crime, in contrast to a felony. At common law a misdemeanor was a crime other than treason or a felony. Although it might be a grave offense, it did not affect the feudal bond or take away the offender's property. By the 19th cent.
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, that is so declared in statute or was so considered in common lawcommon law,
system of law that prevails in England and in countries colonized by England. The name is derived from the medieval theory that the law administered by the king's courts represented the common custom of the realm, as opposed to the custom of local jurisdiction that
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. In early English law a felony was a heinous act that canceled the perpetrator's feudal rights and forfeited his lands and goods to the king, thus depriving his prospective heirs of their inheritance. The accused might be tried by an appeal of felony, i.e., personal combat with his accuser, the losing party to be adjudged a felon (see ordealordeal,
ancient legal custom whereby an accused person was required to perform a test, the outcome of which decided the person's guilt or innocence. By an ordeal, appeal was made to divine authority to decide the guilt or innocence of one accused of a crime or to choose between
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). The appeal of felony was gradually replaced by rational modes of trial and was altogether abolished in England in 1819. In addition to the forfeiture of his property, the convicted felon usually suffered death, long imprisonment, or banishment. Death was an especially common English penalty in the 18th and the early 19th cent. To the list of common-law felonies—including murder, rape, theft, arson, and suicide—many others were added by statute. With the abolition of forfeitures in England in 1870 the felony acquired essentially its modern character. Felony is used in various senses in the United States. In federal law, any crime punishable by death or more than one year's imprisonment is a felony. This definition is followed in some states; in others the common-law definition is retained, or else statutes specifically label certain crimes as felonies. Other possible consequences of committing a felony are loss of the rights of citizenship, deportationdeportation,
expulsion of an alien from a country by an act of its government. The term is not applied ordinarily to sending a national into exile or to committing one convicted of crime to an overseas penal colony (historically called transportation).
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 if the felon is an alien, and liability to a more severe sentencesentence,
in criminal law, punishment that a court orders, imposed on a person convicted of criminal activity. Sentences typically consist of fines, corporal punishment, imprisonment for varying periods including life, or capital punishment, and sometimes combine two or more
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 for successive offenses. Felonies are usually tried by jury, and in some states the accused must first have been indicted by a grand jurygrand jury,
in law, body of persons selected to inquire into crimes committed within a certain jurisdiction. It usually comprises a greater number than the trial, or petit (also, petty) jury, having since early common law days had between 12 and 23 members.
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.

felony

(formerly) a serious crime, such as murder or arson. All distinctions between felony and misdemeanour were abolished in England and Wales in 1967
References in periodicals archive ?
Ujnder the misprision statute, the defendant must commit an
Abraham Becker observes that Le Roy's astute criticism of the earlier commentary tradition suggests that many of his own misprisions are intentional.
1) Margalit Har-Shefi was convicted of misprision of felony (2) for not informing the police of what she knew concerning Amir's intention to assassinate the Prime Minister.
As Ledbetter piles on the damaging details, explaining how the nature of the system breeds so many assassins, exploiters and incompetents, the book becomes something of a shaggy dog story, in which our protagonist lumbers from one enemy to the next, from one misprision to another, and invariably ends up rolling over or being kicked.
The Zambian government said yesterday that it would charge former president Kenneth Kaunda with misprision of treason on the grounds that he had concealed his part in last October's failed coup.
Sabato and Garment posit some past golden age of journalism in which gross misprision and policy blundering were easily and often exposed by reporters--when it was, they do not say.
Baird's wife, Patsy, a USDA-licensed Class "A" dealer (animal breeder) and owner of breeding facility Pat's Pine Tree Farm, pleaded guilty to misprision of felony mail fraud.
and British governments, however, the Dole Government dismissed that charge and instead tried the Hawaiian monarch for misprision of treason, which was not a death penalty offense.
Yet none of this impinged on his determinedly hostile misprision of dialectics, against which he offered "contrapuntal criticism" as a more subtle substitute because attuned to common ground and resistant to binaries and closure.
Ryn's principal concern in this recent supplement is to explain that conservatism's political impotence is paradoxically an excessive preoccupation with practical politics and a neglect, indeed a misprision, of the philosophical basis of any valid and viable conservative political program.
The very concern to discuss ambiguity, the perception that there is ambiguity, that some things are ambiguous in a literary text, bespeaks a desire for meaning--I do not yet speak of a clarification of meaning--that, if Jakobson and Poe and Mallarme et al are even to a slight extent right, may be a sort of literary misprision, a misprision of or about the literary text in the reader/critic's mind in the first place, a sense that meaning is or should be in some manner one of the text's principal concerns, when, when it comes to distinguishing the "literary" from the "non," it might be something quite different that we have to call upon.