mistle thrush

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mistle thrush

, missel thrush
a large European thrush, Turdus viscivorus, with a brown back and spotted breast, noted for feeding on mistletoe berries

Mistle Thrush

 

(Turdus viscivorus ), a bird of the family Turdidae Of the order Passeriformes. It is the largest of the European thrushes, with a body measuring up to 30 cm long. The back is grayish brown, and the underpart is light with dark spots. The bird inhabits the pine forests (in the north) and deciduous forests of Europe and Asia, as far east as the Sayan Mountains and as far south as the Himalayas. It nests in trees and lays a clutch of four-five greenish eggs. The mistle thrush feeds on invertebrates as well as berries (of the mountain ash, mistletoe), the seeds of which it distributes because they are not digested. In the years of abundant mountain ash harvest, the mistle thrush sometimes winters in the north.

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Mistle thrushes are noticeably larger than song thrushes.
The Mistle Thrushes have more distinct spots and the Redwings are identified by a distinct stripe of white over their eyes and a reddish patch on their flanks.
Mistle thrushes can survive winter frosts and snow, but the current milder weather more suits sitting on a clutch of eggs.
WARRING Mistle Thrushes have called a truce now the breeding season is over.
Mistle Thrushes are the greyer-backed, bigger cousin of the familiar Song Thrush, with blotchier spots on the breast.
Two Fieldfare, eight Mistle Thrushes, Corn Buntings, Mipits and Skylarks .
Marauding mistle thrushes who attack in flocks of over 50.
Overall, the area provides a wonderful habitat for wildlife, which presently includes pied wagtails, greenfinches, bullfinches and chaffinches, blue tits, coal tits and mistle thrushes, together with buzzards, sparrow hawks and kestrels, plus three varieties of woodpecker.
He is also accused of using two other cages at Great Standrop and Het Burn to catch or kill wild birds and being in possession of two dead mistle thrushes.
MISTLE Thrushes have started to tune up already in parks and gardens.
Mistle thrushes use food to attract the attention of females.
If you provide a wide enough choice of food, you can expect to attract a surprisingly large variety of birds - among them house sparrows, robins, great tits, blue tits, greenfinches, goldfinches, bullfinches, blackbirds, song and mistle thrushes, dunnocks (that's hedge sparrows), nuthatches, chaffinches, coal, marsh and long-tailed tits and woodpeckers.