mnemonic

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mnemonic

[nə′män·ik]
(psychology)
Aiding or pertaining to memory.
A device, such as combinations of letters, pictures, or words, to stimulate recall of the facts they represent.

mnemonic

(programming)
A word or string which is intended to be easier to remember than the thing it stands for. Most often used in "instruction mnemonic" which are so called because they are easier to remember than the binary patterns they stand for. Non-printing ASCII characters also have mnemonics like NAK, ESC, DEL intended to evoke their meaning on certain systems.

mnemonic

Pronounced "ni-mon-ic." A memory aid. In programming, it is a name assigned to a machine function. For example, COM1 is the mnemonic assigned to serial port #1 on a PC. Programming languages are almost entirely mnemonics. For example, in x86 assembly language, CMP is used to represent the "compare" instruction and JE for "jump if equal."

Not Just for High Tech
Mnemonics have been used as verbal tricks to help people remember just about anything. For example "30 days hath September, April, June and November, etc." is a mnemonic rhyme. "Roy G. Biv" spells out the colors of a rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.
References in periodicals archive ?
While this is not generally so for the Vula'a, most rikwana are mnemonically contained and, following Heidegger, I suggest that this is its essence and power.
I often felt he was treating readers as if they had almost no attention span or were mnemonically challenged.
Gadoffre argues compellingly that this entire transformation was brought about by two extraordinary individuals: the charismatic, mnemonically gifted king himself, and the brilliant, melancholy Guillaume Bude.
The title event of Patches of Fire is a hillside burning with napalm that later comes mnemonically to trigger French's imagination.
Vocal music (VZV) is further complicated by VZVD, VZVF, VZVS, and VZVT which mnemonically stand for Duets, Four-part songs, Solos, and Trios.
Such a method could be called a Mnemonically Oedipal Pterodactyl, which clearly shows the problem: in that phrase, the silent first letters spell MOP, but the enunciated second letters spell NET.
These chords, owned by elder men, mnemonically represent totemic song cycles that enact cosmological migrations and events.