mnemonic

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mnemonic

[nə′män·ik]
(psychology)
Aiding or pertaining to memory.
A device, such as combinations of letters, pictures, or words, to stimulate recall of the facts they represent.

mnemonic

(programming)
A word or string which is intended to be easier to remember than the thing it stands for. Most often used in "instruction mnemonic" which are so called because they are easier to remember than the binary patterns they stand for. Non-printing ASCII characters also have mnemonics like NAK, ESC, DEL intended to evoke their meaning on certain systems.

mnemonic

Pronounced "ni-mon-ic." A memory aid. In programming, it is a name assigned to a machine function. For example, COM1 is the mnemonic assigned to serial port #1 on a PC. Programming languages are almost entirely mnemonics. For example, in x86 assembly language, CMP is used to represent the "compare" instruction and JE for "jump if equal."

Not Just for High Tech
Mnemonics have been used as verbal tricks to help people remember just about anything. For example "30 days hath September, April, June and November, etc." is a mnemonic rhyme. "Roy G. Biv" spells out the colors of a rainbow: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo and violet.
References in periodicals archive ?
A body of research sometimes cited as providing dramatic evidence for practice effects is the performance by certain mnemonists whose feats appear to reveal remarkable spans as an outcome of practice (e.
Memory experts, or mnemonists, are able to remember many details, such as names, numbers, and items.
This correspondence between material and mental libraries recurs in a too-brief allusion by Pliny the Elder, (12) who mentions the great mnemonists of Antiquity: `As for Charmadas of Greece, one could point to any volume in a library and he could recite it by heart, as though he were reading'.
An important alternative to the chunking theory was proposed by Chase, Ericsson and Staszewski (Chase & Ericsson, 1982; Ericsson & Staszewski, 1989; Staszewski, 1990), who supported their theory by detailed studies of mnemonists and experts in mental calculation.
For me, interviewing Tom and others represents an encounter between a historian and mnemonists and an opportunity to compare history as reconstructions of the past by trained specialists on the one hand and memory as recollections of things past in the minds of laymen on the other.