modern algebra

modern algebra

[′mäd·ərn ′al·jə·brə]
(mathematics)
The study of algebraic systems such as groups, rings, modules, and fields.
References in periodicals archive ?
of Kansas) provides undergraduate mathematics majors and prospective high school mathematics teachers a one-semester introduction to modern algebra that emphasizes the field's roots in the issue of the solvability of equations by radicals.
These courses, Elementary Linear Algebra, Number Theory, Introduction to Proofs, Modern Algebra, and Advanced Calculus, traditionally have at least one semester of calculus as a prerequisite, and most have substantially more.
As a young man, he traveled to North Africa and learned Hindu-Arabic numerals and al-jabr, the basis of modern algebra.
This text is intended to serve as a comprehensive introduction to first-year graduate level modern algebra while also providing advanced graduate students with materials for further study, even if the materials don't reach the frontiers of the field.
If Dodson was hostile to Modern Algebra, he could have objected to his contemporaries giving new and strictly mathematical meanings to such everyday words as group, ring and field .
The development of algebra is outlined in these notes under the following headings: Egyptian algebra, Babylonian algebra, Greek geometric algebra, Diophantine algebra, Hindu algebra, Arabic algebra, European algebra since 1500, and modern algebra.
He was the founder of modern Algebra and later physician to King Edward VI.
Peterson created the framework of coding theory based on modern algebra and invented practical methods for error detection and correction, making digital systems used in CD-ROMs and computers reliable.
Over many years of teaching undergraduate modern algebra, Miller (mathematics, State U.
making a case that the attraction of the symmetry of modern algebra is due to its mirroring of how we process images, and discussing memetics, the interdisciplinary research area concerned with the mechanisms of the evolution of human culture.
Peterson, a professor of information and computer sciences at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, created the framework of the coding theory based on modern algebra and invented practical methods for error detection and correction, making digital systems used in CD-ROM and computers reliable.
It provides a foundation in major ideas needed for continued work in mathematics; guides students to think and to express themselves mathematically, that is to analyze a situation, extract pertinent facts, and draw appropriate conclusions; and introduces modern algebra and analysis in sufficient depth to capture some of their spirit and characteristics.