modernity


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Related to modernity: Postmodernity

modernity

the modern age, or the ideas and styles associated with this. In general historical terms, ‘modernity’ refers to the period since the Middle Ages and the RENAISSANCE and is associated with the replacement of TRADITIONAL SOCIETY by modern social forms (see MODERNIZATION). More specifically, it refers simply to the recent, to contemporary ways of doing things. If in one of its senses ‘modernity’ is seen as identified with a belief in rationality and the triumph of truth and science (see the ENLIGHTENMENT) it is now under attack from theorists who see the onset of a ‘postmodern’era (see POSTMODERNITY AND POSTMODERNISM). Against this, for other theorists (as in Marx's phrase ‘all that's solid melts into air’), the flux and uncertainty described as ‘postmodern’ can be seen as inherent in modernity itself.
References in periodicals archive ?
With these "moments of rupture and collapse," El-Ariss asserts that new relations of power unfold between Arab and European, East and West, "tradition" and modernity (50).
In "America's Safest City: Delinquency and Modernity in Suburbia", noted juvenile justice scholar Simon I.
Baillargeon points out instances where the advertisers' vision of modernity might be at odds with local attitudes towards the display of bodies, as in the case of an ad depicting a young mother in a bathing suit.
For example, Dr Rima said, countries growing at a slow pace, like Oman, welcomed modernity but countries, which are growing at a fast pace like the UAE were concerned about losing some of it traditional values.
All of these postures are in consonance with the authors' criticism of the linear time of bourgeois modernity and their attempts to experience time via aesthetic modernity.
Under the supervision of deputy commissioner Zahra Ali Baba and the creative direction of artist-curator Alia Farid, Acquiring Modernity will address the exhibition's overarching theme of 100 years of modernity from 1914 to 2014, a statement said.
There are three main themes that I want to address in Jadran Mimica's analysis of my and others' works that I feel can contribute to important discussions in anthropology (both Melanesianist and beyond): (1) the conceptualization and theorization of modernity and modernization, (2) the strengths and shortcomings of using 'keywords' (Williams 1985) in ethnography and their application to non-Western histories and cultures, and (3) the use of comparative ethnographies and historical change.
Christian readers may detect echoes of the debate between a hermeneutics of continuity versus one of rupture in the central and even more radical distinction guiding the argument of this book: between "normative modernity," which conserves the resources of tradition all the while bringing it into dialogue with the people of today, and "critical modernity," which abandons traditional metaphysics altogether.
Rene Girard and Secular Modernity: Christ, Culture, and Crisis" by Scott Cowdell (Associate Professor and Research Fellow in Public and Contextual Theology of Charles Stuart University, Canberra, Australia) is a 248 page compendium comprising an insightful and systematic interpretation of Rene Girard's controversial approach to secular modernity.
Also cited are some who are no friends to tradition but who have "winningly phrased" something about modernity.
He was one of the leading lights of the New African Movement, a political, cultural and social and literary renaissance that eventuated in the country between 1860 and 1960 whole-heartedly engaged with the transformation of European modernity into New African modernity.
Modernity, Freedom, and the African Diaspora: Dublin, New Orleans, Paris.