modernize

(redirected from modernizers)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal.

modernize

To adapt a building or structure to current conditions, tastes, or usage, usually by remodeling.
References in periodicals archive ?
A book of essays published four months later by a vanguard of modernizers included a passionate denunciation of Hague's leadership.
Instead of fighting a losing war against modernity, the Tory modernizers would embrace it.
To modernizers focused on the future, the market was incompatible with their vision of city development.
In these debates, modernizers prioritized economic prosperity, technological innovation, and efficiency.
Today's so-called neoconservatives, who took some credit for defeating the Soviet Union, share much of the America-centric optimism of the liberal modernizers of the 1960s, and their eagerness to export democracy American-style is almost as simplistic as the earlier faith that "transitional" societies were on their way to resembling "rational" Western models.
Both have made major claims, both have sought to marginalize those who disagree with them, and both have shared some of the same hubris as the modernizers who thought they could develop a unified theory of human behavior.
The authors also note that the undertakings of the early modernizers were carried out under pressure and in the face of strong resistance from the Ottoman Muslim population who were psychologically conditioned to resent imitating the West.
Sex in the Shipman's Tale similarly provides contexts which modernizers handle with varying degrees of explicitness and innuendo.
Modernizers are willing to grant legal equality to blacks and women because it helps ensure a dynamic business climate.
Another is her acute analysis of the changes in political alignments, powerholding, and wealth distribution that occurred with the liberal Reform of the 1 850s, processes that stimulated the rise of a new political and property-holding middle class, and the later bifurcation of the liberals into a more populist, rural, caudillo-dominated group and an urban-based, republican (though not radically democratic) group of progressive modernizers.
The modernizers of early twentieth-century China needed to paint "Confucianism" in the darkest possible colors, and Ko shows in her Introduction how their agenda required a simple model of the oppression of women, admitting none of the complexities she describes.