modern

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modern

1. of, relating to, or characteristic of contemporary styles or schools of art, literature, music, etc., esp those of an experimental kind
2. belonging or relating to the period in history from the end of the Middle Ages to the present

modern

Current. The latest. Typically refers to the most recent model of hardware or version of software.
References in periodicals archive ?
54) More modernly, notes have to take a particular form to be negotiable, (55) and significant differences in legal outcomes could (and still can) turn on minor differences in language.
I came into the world of art from a very conservative family, but I'm a woman who dresses very modernly.
It offers 128 suites, which are modernly designed, consisting of spacious studios, one, two and three bedrooms developed as duplexes.
The 2-storey development is comprised of five modernly designed 1- and 2-bedroom apartments and penthouses.
AengiA had earlier pointed out that Centrotrans Eurolines has vehicles that can contribute to improving the functioning of urban public transport, among which are the 10 modernly equipped minibuses that are for a few months already been parked in garages.
Modernly the four primary theories were identified as: Management by Objective, Balanced Scorecard, Triple Bottom Line, and Stakeholder theory.
In 2009, the couple opened a newly constructed and modernly equipped 8,000 square foot pediatric facility.
Ingenious Contrivances, Curiously Carved: Scrimshaw in the New Bedford Whaling Museum" explores the creatures used using these modernly condemned items and their unique creations as a piece of history.
That's no less ambitious than an Olympic triple- jumper sailing through the rain or a virtuoso violinist pushing his orchestra to a modernly raw interpretation of a score penned 300 years ago.
Its animal feed factories are modernly equipped and computerized to guarantee high quality products and efficiency in operation.
First, at least modernly, New York law contains a direct statement that tax warrants are judgments.