Moisture

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moisture

[′mȯis·chər]
(climatology)
The quantity of precipitation or the precipitation effectiveness.
(meteorology)
The water vapor content of the atmosphere, or the total water substance (gaseous, liquid, and solid) present in a given volume of air.
(physical chemistry)
Water that is dispersed through a gas in the form of water vapor or small droplets, dispersed through a solid, or condensed on the surface of a solid.

Moisture

 

the water content of physical bodies. Moisture depends upon the relative humidity of the surrounding environment, upon the nature of the substance, and, in solids, also upon the degree of porosity and the size of the particles—that is, the general dimensions of the interior and exterior surfaces of the objects. The concept of moisture does not include the content of crystalline water or of chemically bound, so-called constitutional, water—for example, the H2O that is produced only during chemical decomposition.

Moisture is usually characterized by the quantity of water in a substance, expressed in the percentage of the original mass of the moist substance (moisture by mass) or its volume (volume moisture). Moisture can also be characterized as the moisture content, or absolute moisture—the quantity of water relative to a unit of weight of the dry portion of the substance. It is of great significance to the national economy to establish the acceptable degree of moisture for many products and materials; such substances as grain or cement are only useful up to a certain moisture content. The vitality of animal and plant organisms is possible only within certain limits of moisture and relative humidity of the surrounding atmosphere.

References in classic literature ?
Perhaps a sudden rainstorm has splashed its fatal moisture upon an unwiped joint.
Because of the fact that a cable's inevitable enemy is moisture, each cable is wound on an immense spool and rolled into an oven until it is as dry as a cinder.
No; so little moisture was there in my system that I didn't bleed much.
Through one after another of those gray days Alexander drowsed and mused, drinking in the grateful moisture.
A few steps more, and it was within an arm's length, distinct, dark with moisture, and insignificant in size.
Matthew, with a suspicious moisture in his eyes, got up and went out-of-doors.
In the nature of the land, however, around Maldonado, no such reason is apparent; the rocky mountains afford protected situations; enjoying various kinds of soil; streamlets of water are common at the bottoms of nearly every valley; and the clayey nature of the earth seems adapted to retain moisture.
In the southern part of the continent, where the western gales, charged with moisture from the Pacific, prevail, every island on the broken west coast, from lat.
The moisture dripped from the same ledge in the wall on to the sodden leaves beneath, as it had done all through the afternoons of all those past Novembers.
It was so still that I was afraid to move; so still, that I could count each drop of moisture falling from the oozing wall; so still, that when I held my breath to listen, I was deafened by my own heart-beats.
Except for the slight quiver of her lips and the moisture in her eyes that made them brighter, her smile was almost calm as she said:
The fog was much heavier than it had been in the early part of the night; and the atmosphere was so damp, that, although no rain fell, Oliver's hair and eyebrows, within a few minutes after leaving the house, had become stiff with the half-frozen moisture that was floating about.