molecular imprinting


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molecular imprinting

[mə¦lek·yə·lər ′im‚print·iŋ]
(physical chemistry)
A technique for creating receptor structures on a polymer surface that can selectively bind to molecules of interest, molecularly imprinted polymers are used for separations, as catalysts, and in biosensors.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is an important and dynamic area of research, molecular imprinting is one of the approach to produce materials with recognize the ability as compare to the natural system.
A featured preparation method of MIPs as selective adsorbents is molecular imprinting method [23].
The artificial receptors will be developed by various Molecular Imprinting techniques.
He said that some of countries imposed ban on such hazard chemicals including DEHP, DBP, DIBP, and BBP generally and particularly in pediatrics neonatal and maternity wards accessories in hospitals and they have started the use of molecular imprinting popular technology for removing phthalates.
International Conference on Molecular Imprinting (8th: 2014: Zhenjiang, China) Edited by Xinhua Yuan
Molecular imprinting is a new and practical technique, which leads to the preparation of selective recognition sites in a polymer matrix.
The first molecular imprinting medium reported in literature was that of dye molecules in silica matrix (1).
Molecular imprinting is a tool for synthesizing tailor-designed molecular recognition sites in polymers structured at micrometer and nanometer scales.
Also reports about the molecular imprinting as a promising technology for preparing artificial receptors based on molecularly imprinted polymers containing tailor-made recognition sites were presented.
Junqiu Liu, combines a range of methods including molecular imprinting, supramolecular self-assembly, and genetic engineering and employ a range of macromolecular scaffolds, including dendrimers, polymeric micelles, polymer nanoparticles, hydrogels, giant nanotubes and proteins in their study of selenoenzymes, which they hope will lay the ground work for future research to investigate not just selenoenzymes but to help elucidate further the catalytic function of enzymes in a wider context.
The detection can be read in real time, instead of after days or weeks of laboratory analysis, meaning the nanotube molecular imprinting technique could pave the way for biosensors capable of detecting human papillomavirus or other viruses weeks sooner than available diagnostic techniques currently allow.
Molecular imprinting techniques have shown that polymer structures can be used in the development of sensors capable of recognizing certain organic compounds, but recognizing proteins has presented a difficult set of challenges.
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