molybdenum sulfide

molybdenum sulfide

[mə′lib·də·nəm ′səl‚fīd]
(inorganic chemistry)
References in periodicals archive ?
One is a process that uses molybdenum sulfide instead of platinum to liberate hydrogen from water via electrolysis.
Researchers from the United States and Denmark, led by Jens Norskov of Stanford University, used a bio-inspired molybdenum sulfide catalyst coupled with a light-absorbing electrode to make hydrogen fuel from sunlight and water.
3 million increase in molybdenum sulfide inventory at the Endako Mine during the first quarter of 2008.
Researchers at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign have developed a new way to make tiny crystals of molybdenum sulfide, a material that the petroleum industry uses to remove smelly sulfur compounds from gasoline.
DOE's announcement noted that in Phase I "NanoMech developed a molybdenum sulfide particle based additive that is particularly useful for a number of aerospace and manufacturing applications, and NanoMech successfully demonstrated a manufacturing method to produce significant quantities of the lubricant materials to meet potential commercial demand of the new lubricant additive products.
The Ashdown Mine is a historic gold producer (1880s to 1942) and recent molybdenum sulfide concentrate producer (2005-2007).
The high grade molybdenum sulfide concentrate produced will be suitable for roasting and conversion to molybdic oxide.
Molybdenum oxide is the form of molybdenum that is used for most industrial consumption and is priced slightly higher than molybdenum sulfide, the form to be produced from mining at Ashdown.
This early porphyry is a wall rock to mineralization and has been over printed with potassic alteration and contains quartz veinlets with copper and molybdenum sulfides.
The porphyries are extensively altered to sericite schists which contain abundant pyrite and anomalous amounts of copper and molybdenum sulfides.