moniker

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moniker

(1) A name, title or alias. See alias.

(2) A COM object that is used to create instances of other objects. Monikers save programmers time when coding various types of COM-based functions such as linking one document to another (OLE). See COM and OLE.
References in periodicals archive ?
But, in January 2002, 'Footballers Wives' - with a central character named Chardonnay - started on UK TV and in 2002, the moniker reached 519 in the charts and by 2003 Chardonnay was at 372.
Both male and female gang members may be known by monikers.
Despite these monikers being the most popular, many pet lovers choose less conventional names for their companions such as "Zippity Do Dawg" and "Felix Thunder Paws.
The school has a zero tolerance policy for monikers and prohibits students from carrying permanent markers.
The majority of the top 10 pet monikers are also among the most popular baby names in the United States," said Curtis Steinhoff, director of Corporate Communications at VPI.
Much of the graffiti Farkas sees in a typical month reveals the culprit's nickname, or moniker, or that of his ``crew.
He has knowledge of the monikers and style of tagging for nearly every gang and tagging crew in the valley and many from Los Angeles and surrounding areas.
Known on the Web site simply as Joe - and entitled, because he has been so prolific, to a logo of a tiny green car next to his moniker - Morris has posted close to 500 prices since March, nearly all in Palmdale and the eastern Antelope Valley.
Palmdale has changed the names of some streets, putting their previous monikers in parenthesis on street signs and maps.
Gang members in Pacoima have been lying low in the past two weeks, but the lull in gang violence may be deceiving, said Tompkins, a four-year CRASH veteran who speaks with a slight Boston accent and knows many of the local gang members by face or moniker, if not always by given name.
By removing the monikers and slogans, the city effectively vanquishes the tagger's fame.
Nominations phoned into the Daily News came from two distinct camps: sincere dog lovers, who proposed names including Lucky and Hershey, and barking-mad Republicans, who offered monikers such as Paula Jones and Stonewaller.